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CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS


1965 U.S. champions World silver medalists North American gold medalists


1964 U.S. silver medalists Olympic bronze medalists Fourth at World Championships


1963 U.S. silver medalists 8th at World Championships North American bronze medalists


1962 U.S. bronze medalists 1961 U.S. junior pairs champions


hometown of Chicago. Now, on the 50th anniversary of those Games,


Alianna as seeing the words “wind chill” pop up on her local TV weather forecast. Tat is, until this past January.


CAUGHT UP IN A WHIRLWIND Te world as Vivian and Ron Joseph had


known it began to swirl as fast as a scratch spin. It was 2013, the year leading up to the


2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, when the Josephs got their first of many calls from a reporter inquiring about the record book dis- crepancies surrounding the 1964 Olympic pairs medals. Many record books, including the IOC’s


official website, listed the 1964 pairs medal- ists as: 1. Soviet Union, 2. West Germany, 3. Canada. But as this reporter looked deeper into those Innsbruck Games, she discovered that the American team — the Josephs — had been awarded the bronze medal in 1966 after the IOC deemed the West German team of Marika Kilius and Hans-Jürgen Bäumler ineligible, be- cause of signing a professional contract. Tis set off an international chain of events.


Kilius and Baumler handed over the silver med- als, which would go to the Canadians. Likewise, the Canadians gave the bronze medals to their federation. On Oct. 22, 1966, Vivian and Ron Joseph were awarded those same medals by U.S. Olympic Committee President Emeritus Ken- neth Wilson in a subdued ceremony in their


Vivian, 67, and Ron, 70, found themselves caught up in a whirlwind. A part of their once-closed lives suddenly reopened. And this Pandora’s box could not be closed.


MERELY TEENAGERS Tere were few expectations for the young U.S.


figure skating team at the 1964 Innsbruck Games. Just three years earlier, the sports world mourned the shocking loss of the entire 1961 U.S. World Team, which perished in a plane crash in Brussels en route to the World Championships in Prague. An entire generation of American athletes, coaches, officials and their families perished. Imagine what it must have been like: 15-year-


old Vivian and 19-year-old Ron joined Peggy Flem- ing, 15, and Scott Allen, 14, among others, repre- senting their country on the other side of the world. Heading into those Olympics, the Josephs were not even considered the best American pairs


SKATING 29


U.S. FIGURE SKATING


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