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Kernels


Karen Oertley has been appointed to executive director of the AIMS International (Amusement Industry Manufacturers & Suppliers). Bringing nearly 30 years of industry experience to the role, as publisher and editor-in- chief of the now defunct Amusement Business magazine she maintained a highly visible industry presence. A member of AIMS International’s board of directors for eight years, she is also the former chair of the Applause Award board of governors and has served on several IAAPA committees. Most recently, she performed in marketing roles for Hopkins and WhiteWater.


Mike Oswald has joined ProFun Management as executive vice-president at its headquarters in Tustin, California. Assigned to Abu Dhabi in 2008, where ProFun has a management contract with Farah Leisure, the American executive took the big budget Yas Waterworld through the feasibility, design, and construction process and ultimately to a very successful grand opening, later being named general manager of Ferrari World Abu Dhabi and working on the development of the adjacent Warner Bros theme park, opening soon.


Former S&S salesman Kevin Rohwer has joined TAA Industries as general manager for our its new American subsidiary TAA USA. Based in Utah, Kevin has 25 years experience in marketing strategy, promotion, sales management and entrepreneurial experience, many of those years in the amusement industry. He is also a former IAAPA committe member.


Mike Fehnel has been appointed to the position of vice-president and general manager for Cedar Fair’s Carowinds amusement park in Charlotte, North Carolina. Replacing Bart Kinzel, the son of former Cedar Fair CEO Dick Kinzel who resigned last month, he arrives after more than 20 years at Dorney Park in Pennsylvania. In addition, Gary Chadwick has been promoted from director of merchandise and sales to vice-president for resale, overseeing all aspects of in-park revenue.


Accesso has signed a three-year agreement with Ripley’s Entertainment to feature the company’s Passport eCommerce platform at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada in Toronto. Meanwhile the virtual-queuing and ticketing specialist has announced a three-year partnership with Vision Works Global in an attempt to crack the South Korean theme park market. “The monetisation of queue lines is revolutionary for our clients’ bottom-line,” notes Vision Works Global CEO, Jin Wook Choi. “We [have] noticed attractions taking painstaking efforts during the planning and design phase to make sure they accommodate secondary entrances for front-of-the-line access.”


WhiteWater announces new executive roles


WhiteWater West founder and CEO Geoff Chutter’s son, Paul Chutter (left), has been appointed vice- president of sales operations and corporate development for the leading waterpark supplier. Aged 32, Paul brings a financial and legal background to his new role. He began his career in corporate finance, working as a mergers and acquisitions advisor for the Bank of Nova Scotia. For


the past five years he has worked with UBS Investment Bank in London, England and Toronto, where he dealt with CEOs from some of Canada’s largest corporations and Europe’s largest financial institutions. Meanwhile Andrew Mowatt and Franceen Gonzales have new responsibilities at WhiteWater. Mowatt, who joined the waterpark supplier in 1995, takes up the newly formed position of executive vice-president for corporate accounts. Gonzales, who joined the WhiteWater team last year after a distinguished waterpark career, becomes the new strategic leader for the business development team throughout the Americas.


SEPTEMBER 2014 27


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