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<< Figure 2: Abundance forecasts the need for 45 trillion sensors in about 20 years, out of


which about 67% will likely be new types of sensors not yet in volume product. Historical development cycles of 30 years would delay Abundance. TSensors initiative aims at


significant reduction of development cycle to support Abundance timeframe. >>


Graphical representation of TSensors Initiative is shown in figure 2. TSensors Initiative is structured in three phases (figure 3):


• TSensors Summits conferences with invited sensor visionaries providing forecast for forthcoming ultrahigh volume new sensor applications. This enables structuring marketing development target (customers involvement), one of the most important contributors to accelerated market introduction. The first TSensors Summits were organised at UC Berkeley (April 2013), Stanford University (October 2013) and Tokyo (February 2014).


• TSensors Roadmap — a volunteer driven activity of over 100 sensor technology professionals worldwide who are developing a document with recommended sensor technology platforms best suited to support emerging applications. This will enable development to focus on a reduced number of technologies simplifying the overall resulting development effort and simplifying later standardisation.


• TSensors Supply Chain development — the activity focused on incubating start of accelerated development of required sensors using recommended technology platforms.


<< Figure 3: TSensors initiative is split into three


phases: TSensors Summits, TSensors Roadmap and TSensors Supply Chain development. >>


The TSensors Roadmap is currently divided into the following applications, each representing one Chapter:


• One Chapter on education to support IoT and TSensors • Eight Chapters focused on sensor technology platforms for the following TApps:


• Sensors for noninvasive fitness/wellness/health monitoring. • Sensors for minimally invasive health monitoring. • Sensors for personal imaging (e.g., acoustic, ultrasound, hyperspectral, THz, Xray).


• Computer senses. • Environmental sensing (pollution of air, water, food, soil, etc.) • Infrastructure sensors (roads, bridges, buildings). • Sensors for smart food production. • Sensors for energy generation and control.


Five Chapters focused on technology platforms for TSensors infrastructure: • Digital manufacturing (e.g. 3D printing) for sensors, ICs and packaging.


• Energy harvesting and ultralow power electronics for sensors and networks.


• Ultralow power wireless communication. • Network infrastructure for Internet of Everything, including security.


• Analytics for sensors. >> Continued on page 46


45 | commercial micro manufacturing international Vol 7 No.2


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