This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
SMED | ARTICLE


EXCHANGE OF DIES in Micro Manufacturing


GORUR N SRIDHAR << Figure 1 >>


What is SMED? Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED) as it is commonly known is defined as “The time elapsed between when the ‘last good piece’ of product A comes off and the ‘first good piece’ of product B starts.


” This is as illustrated in the figure 1.


SINGLE MINUTE


Why do we need SMED? Within production strategies such as lean manufacturing and just in time ( JIT), we are aiming to reduce the waste within the system, waste being one of three main areas as defined in Lean/Toyota Production System (TPS): the Waste of Muda (non-value adding), Mura (unevenness) and Muri (overburden). Waste reduction is an effective way to increase profitability.


SMED tackles all of these waste areas but its greatest strength is in helping us to achieve the elimination of Mura, which can be translated as unevenness, irregularity, lack of uniformity or inequality.


The biggest obstacle to having smaller batches is the changeover time of the equipment.


SMED is probably one of the most important lean manufacturing tools, if not the most important, for enabling just in time production.


To better understand the concept of SMED let us understand its two main components:


1. Internal activities are those activities that can only be performed safely when the equipment is stopped, an example of this can be unbolting the tool in the machine etc. 2. External activities are those that can be performed when the equipment is in operation, such as fetching the next tool etc.


26 | commercial micro manufacturing international Vol 7 No.2


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52