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Powering Up After a Storm


Lights out? Thirty-one percent of power outages are triggered by the weather. Line workers must battle the elements to find problem areas and re- store service as quickly and safely as possible. “We know our members want to


know why the lights are out and when they’re coming back,” stated Martin Walls, Director of Operations at Lake Region Electric Cooperative “First we must find the problems. Then we fol- low a series of steps to bring the lights back on.” Efforts are made to restore power


to the largest number of members as quickly as possible. Then crews fix problems impacting smaller groups of members.


Restoring power When an outage occurs, line crews work to pinpoint problems. They start with high-voltage transmission lines. Transmission towers and cables that supply power to thousands of consum- ers rarely fail. But when damage oc- curs, these facilities must be repaired before other parts of the system can operate. Next, crews check distribution sub- stations. Each substation serves hun- dreds or thousands of members. When


Board of Trustees


Gary Cooper ....................................Pres. Bobby Mayfield ........................Vice Pres. Jim Loftin ..............................Secr.-Treas. Jack Teague ..................Asst Secr.-Treas. Randall Shankle ....................... Member Lynn Lamons ............................. Member Scott Manes .............................. Member Staff


Hamid Vahdatipour ..........................CEO Ben McCollum ..................Dir. of Finance Martin Walls ..................Dir. of Operations Stanley Young ................Dir. of Marketing Larry Mattes ...................................Editor Tina Glory-Jordan .......................Attorney


LREC Powerline Press


a major outage occurs, line crews in- spect substations to discover if prob- lems stem from transmission lines feeding into the substation, the substa- tion itself, or if problems exist down the line.


If the problem cannot be isolated at a distribution substation, distribution lines are checked. These lines carry power to large groups of members in communities or housing developments. If local outages persist, supply lines (also called tap lines) are inspected. These lines deliver power to transform- ers, either mounted on poles or placed on pads for underground service, out- side businesses, schools, and homes. If your home remains without pow-


er, the service line between a trans- former and your home may need to be repaired. Always call LREC at 918- 772-2526 or 800-364-LREC to report an outage. This helps crews isolate lo- cal issues.


Stay in the Know Members can view the outage map at


www.lrecok.coop, which shows areas that are experiencing outages. LREC members can also opt-in for outage text alerts and restoration updates by setting up 245105 their SmartHub app.


Office Hours Monday-Friday


8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Telephone


800-364-LREC or 918-772-2526 Website:


www.lrecok.coop Locations


Hulbert, Wagoner & Tahlequah, OK. Main Office Address P.O. Box 127 Hulbert, OK 74441


Follow these safety steps at home during a power outage:


• Before calling LREC to report an outage, first check to see if your home’s circuit panel or fuse box hasn’t tripped or blown a fuse. This can also cause a power failure. If tripped, reset the breaker or replace the blown fuse.


• Turn off and unplug all unnecessary appliances and electrical equipment. When power is restored, turn on items one at a time.


• Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. An unopened refrigerator keeps food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer keeps food cool for about 48 hours.


• Individual households may receive special attention if loss of electricity affects life support systems or poses another immediate danger. If you or a family member depends on life support, call LREC before a power outage happens.


Hidden Account Number Look for your account number hidden in this


issue of the Powerline Press. If you find your number, Lake Region Electric will credit your next bill. To claim your credit, notify LREC’s Hulbert


office by phone or mail during the month of publication. The amount increases by $10 with each


issue your prize goes unclaimed to a maximum of $50. For more information, call 800-364-LREC or 918-772-2526


Cooperative bylaws are available upon


request at Lake Region Electric Cooperative’s office in Hulbert.


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