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Utility Bills Increase Due to Cold





February may be the month of flaming hearts and red hot lovers, but for Oklahoma consumers


there was nothing warm about it. Utility customers statewide will be reminded of February’s frigid temperature when bills begin arriving in March. Kiwash Electric members should also brace for higher than normal bills. “Even the most energy conscious members will see higher bills this month due to the cold weather in February,” said Dwayne Hurliman, consumer accounts representative.


When temperatures hover in the single digits, heating units must work overtime to keep homes warm. The result is increased usage and energy bills.


Members who are struggling to pay their bill should contact Kiwash Electric at 888-832-3362 before their bill is overdue. Your co-op is happy to work with you to establish a payment schedule that will help you avoid disconnects and late fees.


Scholarship Deadline 


Teens looking for financial help to further their education are reminded to apply for a Kiwash Electric scholarship by


April 15. Scholarship guidelines and applications are available online at www.kiwash.coop, or contact Lisa Willard at 888-832-3362.


Apply for Energy Camp


Kiwash Electric will choose two eighth graders to attend YouthPower Energy Camp on May 27-30 at Canyon Camp near Hinton. Contest details are available online at www.kiwash.coop, or contact Lisa Willard at 888-832-3362. Entry deadline is April 15.


BY DENNIS KRUEGER G E N E R A L M A N A G E R


Understanding Rights-of-Way


power lines that bring electricity to your home or business. This means we must periodically use our right-of-way to repair the lines that cross your property.


A


Some of you may be uncertain as to what “right-of-way” really means. It is a legal agreement that allows your electric co-op to access to the property directly beneath— and to either side— of an electric power line. Also called an easement, the right-of-way allows co-op crews to enter the property at any time to perform maintenance or repair our equipment. We may also need to remove trees and brush that would obstruct our activities in the right-of-way.


Even though this easement allows us a right of entry, we try not to disrupt existing activities on the property. We do our best to inform property owners prior to entering; however, sometimes time will not allow us to do so. Reasonable care will be used to minimize damage as we work, but some disruptions such as tire ruts from heavy equipment are inevitable.


s your electric power supplier, we take responsibility for maintaining the 3,000 miles of


right-of-way that restricts our ability to work on the lines. This is less of a problem on open farmland, but can be troublesome in more populated residential areas.


“We ask that you not place storage buildings, fences, swing sets or other structures beneath a power line—and this includes hay bales.”


We ask that you not place storage buildings, fences, swing sets, or other types of structures beneath a power line —and this includes hay bales. It is unfair to other members if these items restrict Kiwash Electric crews from maintaining or repairing the lines after a storm. In addition, if a storm brings the power line down onto a structure located beneath it, there’s a strong possibility a fire could destroy the building and its contents. This results in a loss for the property owner.


We want all members served by Kiwash Electric Cooperative to understand the rights and responsibilities of the right-of-way. As your power supplier, we will do our part to maintain electric


service if you will help us in this way.


The landowner, on the other hand, must also comply with the rules of the right-of- way. There must be no activity, building, or other type of structure located within the


By working together, we can benefit all the other member-owners who rely on electricity to improve their daily lives. Thank you for allowing us the opportunity to manage your Touchstone Energy Cooperative.


2 | MARCH 2014 | Kilowatt


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