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Materials |


show preview Polyscope can stand the heat


Hall 5/E08 Polyscope will launch its Xiran IZ terpolymers of styrene, maleic anhydride and N-phe- nylmaleimide, which are designed to increase the thermal performance of styrenic engineering plastic blends. The Xiran IZ1018M and IZ0721M grades offer a glass transition temperature of 175˚C and can be exposed to higher processing temperatures with excellent miscibility in styrenic polymers such as ABS, according to the company. The two grades are distin- guished by their specific ratios of styrene, maleic anhydride and N-phenylmaleimide.


Both grades offer high


thermal stability while the presence of the maleic anhydride groups results in good adhesion. Compared to similar materials, the IZ grades deliver improved heat performance and low volatile residual levels, which is especially relevant for styrenics such as ABS.


Processing characteristics are in most cases improved, the company says. The company will also display one of the largest automotive parts to be produced using one of its Xiran compounds - the sunroof frame for Citroën’s DSW3 Cabrio. The part runs the entire length of the car’s


roofline and is produced in a 15% glass reinforced SMA/ABS blend. It measures around 2,000mm by 1,000mm. According to Polyscope


sales and business develop- ment director Peter Tackx, alternative polymer-based solutions such as PBT/ASA would have required a higher glass loading to achieve the same performance, adding around 15% to the weight of the part.


The Xiran part


requires no post-mould cooling and the manufac-


IP produced in Xiran Struktol aims to lift performance


Hall 6/A23 Specialty polymer additive company Struktol will focus its K presence on some of its latest products for improving the performance and processing of engineering plastics. The latest addition to its


Intelligent Additive Solution line is TR 063A. Targeted at PA6 and 66 compounds, the company says the new grade


offers high compatibility and improved performance over alternatives such as montan ester waxes. Struktol has also devel-


oped two products for the engineering plastics sector that combine compatibilisa- tion with a lubricant to ease the incorporation of fillers (mineral or glass) while improving mixing, flow and release. TR 229 is intended for


use in PC and PC/ABS blends and PA6 and 66 compounds and is FDA sanctioned for use in indirect food contact. TR 219 is for use in PA6 and 66 and PET compounds. Meanwhile, RP 28 is a


compatibilizer and blending aid designed to ease incorpo- ration of regrind/recycled product in a wide range of polymers. ❙ www.struktol.com


turer is able to produce the spoiler and rear brackets within the same mould, further improving the economics. ❙ www.polyscope.eu


Food grade TPU


from Huntsman Hall 8b/F79


Huntsman is using K 2013 for the introduction of its new thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) grades suitable for food contact components. Target applications for the


new products include harvest- ing and picking equipment, processing and dispensing machinery, conveyor belts and many other food and drink- related applications. ❙ www.huntsman.com


Topas ups heat resistance with latest COCs


Hall 7/A05 Topas will be exhibiting with parent company Polyplastics, showing its latest cyclo olefin copolymers (COC) develop-


www.injectionworld.com


ments, including new elasto- mers, compounds and high heat grades. COC polymers provide high clarity and thermal resistance,


making them suitable for applications in touch screen and light distribution devices, says the company. New introductions include


grades with HDT values approaching 200˚C and a high clarity film grade – Topas 7010F-600. ❙ www.topas.com


October 2013 | INJECTION WORLD 57


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