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Applications | electrical and electronic


of ± 0.05mm. A surface resistivity of 105 ohms ensures effective dissipation of electrostatic charge (ESD). “Substantial benefits were achieved by replacing


their metal assembly with a one piece, injection moulded cartridge holder. Engineering specifications were met or exceeded and production and secondary assembly costs were reduced by 15% which is a significant gain especially in a very competitive market application,” says Michael Sandeen, business develop- ment manager at Lehvoss North America. Meanwhile, Teijin has expanded the range of


polycarbonates it offers for production of in mould decorated (IMD) hand-held device enclosures. The latest addition to Teijin’s PC portfolio is a range of glass fibre reinforced Multilon grades with a specially developed additive package claimed to provide 40% better flow than competitive products, opening up potential for further lightweighting. The new range covers glass reinforcement levels


from 10% to 50%. The compounds are said to provide flame retardancy equivalent to UL94 V-0 at 0.6mm together with the high dimensional stability required in the hand-held device sector. The new Multilon grades


can be coloured to suit the application. Teijin claims that compared to the PC resins


commonly used for mass-market smartphones, the new grades are less prone to wrinkling, cracking and damage of the IMD surface.


Click on the links for more information: ❙ www.dsmep.comwww.dupont.comwww.basf.comwww.lehvoss.dewww.teijin.com


Above: DSM says changes to US regulations open up


opportunities


for thermoplas- tics in MCBs


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