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show preview | Materials Milliken aims to cut energy use


Hall 6/A27 Milliken’s additive display will focus on opportunities to save on materials and energy consumption while improving optical and physical perfor- mance by using its Millad clarifiers for PP, Hyperform HPN nucleators for PP and PE and Hyperform HPR-803i reinforcing agent.


Millad NX 8000 clarifier


offers much improved solubility over previous clarifiers, says Milliken, allowing it to produce levels of clarity matching crystal PS in some applications while processing at significantly lower temperatures. The company says this can lead to productivity improvements of up to 18%, energy savings of up to 13% and 10% reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.


Anti-static options from


Grafe Hall 6/E75 Colour and additive masterbatch producer Grafe will introduce a new antistatic additive devel- oped to help reduce dust build up on polyolefin mouldings. The High Performance


Antistatic Agent (HPAS) has been shown to be effective over periods of more than four years in PP. The company has also devel- oped a number of non- migrating antistatic systems for PP and PC/ASA. ❙ www.grafe.com


56 The clarifier is said to


perform particularly well with the company’s ClearTint polymeric dyes. Suitable for food contact applications, the dyes have no impact on part shrinkage, which the company says can be a significant problem with some pigments used in polyolefins. Milliken’s nucleator


products include the Hyper-


form HPN-20E grade for PP injection moulding applica- tions, which can override the nucleation of pigments and maximise production and part quality and consistency. Typical applications include fine-tun- ing CLTE (coefficient of linear thermal expansion) in production of car bumpers and instrument panels, cycle time reduction and warpage


elimination in the production of pallets and crates, and improving processability and improving optics in packaging applications. HPN-20E can also be used in PE injection moulding applications, where it can increase crystallisation temperature of the polymer to allow earlier de-moulding of parts, reduced cycle times and productivity gains of up to 10% in applications such as caps and closures. The company will also


exhibit its Hyperform HPR-803i synthetic reinforcement, which can be used to replace mineral fillers in PP compounds to reduce density. Part surface appearance can be improved, while pigment usage can be reduced, says the company. ❙ www.milliken.com


Light works for Rowa Masterbatch


Hall 8a/B28 Rowa Masterbatch will be demonstrating its Rowalid-LD masterbatch, which is designed to make plastics


cloudy while maintaining transparency. The masterbatch can be used in PMMA, PS or PC and works by altering the refrac-


tive indices. The company claims it gives a higher yield of light compared to conventional light-diffusion masterbatches. ❙ www.rowa-group.com


Soft TPE ups UV resistance


Hall 6/A42 Italy’s API will show its new Neogel range of soft thermo- plastic elastomers, which are based on olefin block copoly- mers (OBC) and are claimed to provide high resistance to UV and ageing. Covering the hardness


range from 35 to 90 Shore A, the grades are developed for


INJECTION WORLD | October 2013


injection moulding applications and are said to yield top quality surface aesthetics. All grades are said to provide good processing performance, allowing them to easily fill fine sections, and are suitable for multi-component moulding applications in combination with PP and PE. The company says the


Neogel TPE product line includes grades suitable for food contact.


API will also show a mineral


water bottle cap it has developed in combination with the Italian compression moulding machinery group Sacmi using its Apinat Bio com- postable polymer technology. ❙ www.apiplastic.com


www.injectionworld.com


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