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OFF TRACK £77m


This headline figure is being spread over eight areas of Britain and Four National


Parks. With match funding from the cities in question, that increases to £148m, making investment per head at £10, as


recommended by the Get Britain Cycling report.


20mph


Some of the cash, including that allocated to Manchester, will see the introduction of more 20mph zones in residential areas.


122


This sober statistic is the number of cyclists who died on UK roads in 2012, suggesting it is high time we adequate investment from the authorities.


Daniel Gillborn, Director


Olympic legacy, mass participation and Cycle to Work Day


The London 2012 Olympics may be over, but there’s a chance for a cycle legacy...


£20m


The National Parks will split £20m, with £5m going to the Peak District, £4.4m to Dartmoor, £3.8m to the South Downs and £3.6m to the New Forest.


THIS TIME last year we were all basking in Olympic glory. Over 10,000 athletes from 204 nations competed in 302 events at London 2012 – a truly remarkable celebration of sport that brought the whole country together. Of the 65 medals won by Team GB, 12 of them came from cycling. A year later and that word we all secretly didn’t quite understand is beginning to surface again – legacy. Where do we go from here? How do we ensure that in four years’ time we will enjoy the same success? How do we keep moving forward? Looking at cycling specifically it’s clear to see that


things are already well underway. Most recently Chris Froome became the second Brit to win the Tour De France and we recently saw the streets of London buzzing with nearly 16,000 cyclists as part of Ride London – the biggest cycling sportive ever in the UK. Ride London, in particular, was fantastic not just for the elite athletes, but because it was a mass participation event that encouraged people from all walks of life to get on their bikes. The result was more than impressive. Just imagine if we could keep that spirit going and


channel it into our daily lives? That’s what we’re hoping to do on September 12th 2013 with Cycle to Work Day. The idea behind it is simple – we want to encourage


£692m


The (admittedly particularly expensive) M74 five mile extension in Scotland cost £692m (source BBC), dwarfing this £77m cycle investment. However, come advocates say this cash injection for cycling is positive as it indicates top-level political support for cyclists.


BIKEBIZ.COM


as many people as possible to cycle to work for just one day. We hope that by getting people out on their bikes, we will inspire a nation of latent cyclists to take to two wheels for their commute to work. With just a few weeks to go we’re keen to make the


day as successful as possible – and we need your help! To find out more about Cycle to Work Day and how you can get involved with it, help us promote it and spread the word, visit www.cycletoworkday.org and visit the downloads section.


Daniel Gillborn is director of


Cyclescheme, the UK’s leading provider of tax-free bikes for work. You can reach him on Twitter @DGCyclescheme


BIKEBIZ SEPTEMBER 87


40%


Cambridge is aiming high, plotting to have 40 per cent of all journeys in the city made by bike in ten years time. The £4.1m investment will be used to that end, including increased parking for bikes at the train station.


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