This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PENALTY


If a player moves a loose impediment in a bunker that affects both the player and his or her partner, both players incur a two-stroke penalty under Rule 13-4.


NO


A player cannot stand on an


extension of his or her partner’s line of play or line of putt behind the ball during a stroke. This is a breach of 14-2b that would apply to the partner playing the stroke, or to the side if the breach assisted the other.


the putting green to indi- cate a line for putting for a stroke from the putting green. This is a breach of Rule 8-2b and the player who is putting would incur a two-stroke penalty. If your partner at-


tends the flagstick, it is authorized. Striking him or her would result in penalty. Only one partner


will incur a penalty if he or she accidentally plays the other’s ball. That player will incur the general penalty for playing a wrong ball, but his or her partner incurs no penalty even if the wrong ball belongs to him or her. There are certain situ-


> >


ations in which the whole side gets the applicable pen- alty. If there is a maximum penalty for the round the penalty will apply to both


players. For example, if one partner has 15 clubs, both players incur the penalty. On the other hand, one of the players using a non- conforming club during the round gets both the player and the partner disquali- fied from the competition. If a player’s breach of a rule assists his or her partner in playing the hole (or ad- versely affects an opponent’s play) then the partner will incur the applicable penalty as well. So if you remove a loose impediment in a bunker that affects both you and your partner’s ball, you both incur a two-stroke penalty under Rule 13-4. Since only one of


the two scores made by a side needs to be used, one partner could incur a penalty that would normally


PENALTY


Only one partner will incur a penalty if he or she accidentally plays the other’s ball. That player will incur the general penalty for playing a wrong ball, but his or her partner incurs no penalty even if the wrong ball belongs to him or her.


result in disqualification. In four-ball, except for the specifically listed penalties in 30-3e and 31-7, a player can be disqualified for a hole only. The example of a wrong ball is a good model. In stroke play that mistake must be corrected prior to playing from the next tee- ing ground. If the mistake isn’t corrected, however, in four-ball the player would only be disqualified from the hole at which the wrong ball was played, not for the


entire competition. It is im- portant, however, that both partners are not disquali- fied on the same hole. That would result in the side being disqualified from the competition. Whether you are plan-


ning to play in the USGA’s Four-Ball Championship or one of the seven four- ball tournaments that the NCGA has to offer, know- ing your rules will help you enjoy the game.


SPRING 2013 / NCGA.ORG / 65


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84