This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The golf ball is the same weight as a real one, but it is much bigger. That difference allows players with slower swing speeds to get that same feeling of compressing the ball as good players when it is struck properly. And that feeling is what keeps so many golfers coming back. SNAG can be set up any-


S CLUB


FOCUS Stevinson Ranch


ince it’s inception in 1995, Stevinson Ranch has been known for being progressive. Its bentgrass greens


thrive in a climate domi- nated by Poa annua. Its meticulously mani-


cured and award-winning course attracts players throughout Northern California, despite being in a town with a population of 313, according to the 2010 U.S. census. It was one of the first


golf courses in the country to be operated 100% by solar power, a feat that was pub- licized on a New York Times square storyboard. So it’s no surprise that


Stevinson Ranch, near Mer- ced, is forward-thinking and dedicated to growing the game of golf. Its men’s club has found


fun ways to attract members, spicing up formats while pairing players with age- appropriate tee boxes. The Stevinson Ranch


men’s club offers an array of tournament types, from stroke play and match play to a Presidents Cup, Modi- fied Stableford, three-club plus a putter, a 6-6-6 (two- man teams with six holes alternate shot, six holes scramble and six holes better ball) and Double Trouble (front nine better ball, back nine aggregate).


But it also places players


on the appropriate tees, and adjusts their handicaps accordingly. So instead of sticking everyone on the back tees and making the setup challenging enough for some and overwhelm- ingly long for others, tees are determined by age.


“We’re playing the tees


from where you normally would play,” said men’s club president Pat Dillon. “It makes it very competitive.” Along with Stevinson


Ranch proudly supporting Youth on Course by grant- ing access for juniors to play after 1 p.m. every day of the week, it offers weekly low- cost, and even free, clinics. It also offers SNAG. SNAG, which stands for


Starting New at Golf, intro- duces the game to children similar to how they would learn other youth team sports. Backed by Jack Nick-


laus, SNAG uses colorful, oversized clubs and balls de- signed for beginners to learn the fundamentals of the game while enjoying success in a sport that can frustrate so many, both young and old, because of its difficulty.


where—on the beach, in the park, in the backyard—and Stevinson Ranch will have a nine-hole course of targets and bulls-eyes around its outdoor pavilion this sum- mer that looks like a cross between miniature golf and the real thing. “A lot of our focus has


gone to SNAG play,” said Mark Fallon, director of golf at Stevinson Ranch. “We have a lot of grow the game initiatives.”


SNAG introduces the game to children.


NCGA MEMBER BENEFIT FREE LESSON PROGRAM


As part of an ever-growing list of membership benefits, the NCGA provides complimentary golf lessons and clinics for its members. Golf professionals offer these lessons and clinics at participating Member Advantage Tee Time Portal courses throughout Northern California. The free weekly lessons run from April 1 through Labor Day. For more


information on where and when these lessons are, visit NCGA.org, call the NCGA office at 831/625-4653 or e-mail member@ncga.org. To register, call the pro shops of participating golf courses.


58 / NCGA.ORG / SPRING 2013


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84