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Sticks Stones AND CAPTURE YOUR SWING DATA


SWISS ARMY KNIFE DRIVER


The TAYLORMADE R1 is the Swiss army knife of drivers, an all-in-one club that can be adjusted and fi ne-tuned 168 different ways. The R1’s loft sleeve can set loft anywhere between 8 and 12 degrees. While decreasing loft normally closes a face, and increasing loft opens it, the R1’s adjustable soleplate offers seven settings that can independently alter face angle to the desired position. The R1 also has the option of adjustable weights. TaylorMade went through 80 different designs for the crown before settling on a white matte fi nish to help eliminate glare, and a black, orange and gray graphic that frames the remaining white area for better alignment. MSRP: $399


From SkyCaddie, the makers of the popular GPS device, comes the SKYPRO, a motion-capturing device attached to the shaft of your club that sends data to your iOS and Android phones. SkyPro weighs just 23 grams and records 3,000 samples of information per second, including clubhead speed, hand speed, swing tempo, time to impact, shaft lean at address, shaft lean at impact, backswing length, takeaway angle halfway back, return angle halfway down, shaft angle at address and shaft angle at impact. MSRP: $199


LARGER SWEET SPOT


Tour Edge prides itself on not paying any tour pro to use its fairway woods (including AT&T champion Brandt Snedeker), and its latest model is worthy of that legacy. The TOUR EDGE EXOTICS XCG6 FAIRWAY WOOD is the longest and most forgiving Exotics fairway wood yet. The Exotic 6 has a deeper face with 65% of the clubhead’s weight distributed to the heel and toe areas for greater forgiveness. It also has a larger sweet spot, thanks to its boomerang face technology. MSRP: $299


62 / NCGA.ORG / SPRING 2013


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