This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
State Amateur Preview


California’s Best Return to Monterey Peninsula Country Club


T


he last time the California State Amateur was held at Monterey Peninsula Country Club, the 1992 U.S. Open


broke out.


Whipping winds ballooned scoring during medal play at the 2007 State Am, turning the seaside Dunes and Shore courses at MPCC into brutal bouts of golf. The stroke average for the 6,762-yard Dunes was 78.3, and the 6,886- yard Shore skied to 80.2 “The wind both of the quali-


fi er days was off the charts,” said MPCC superintendent Bob Zoller. “It wasn’t unplayable, but it was almost turning into goofy golf. “I had hoped we’d see a pretty cool snapshot of how the courses compared to each other, but it was crazy.”


The championship became even crazier once match play began, as the 31st seed breezed through the remaining fi eld. Josh Anderson, a recent graduate of Murrieta Valley High School, survived the 2007 California State Amateur with a 4-and-3 win over Joseph Greiner in the fi nals, capturing a title that has eluded Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson.


The 102nd version of the California State Amateur returns to MPCC from June 17-22, with a slight twist. While the medal play will once again be hosted on both MPCC courses, the match play will switch over to the Dunes. In 2007, the match play was staged on the Shore Course, which had been breathtakingly renovated in 2005, and joined the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am rota in 2010. “As a match play golf course, the Dunes is really good,” Zoller said. “We have the California Junior Girls State Championship there every year, and the matches are always very good. The greens can be pretty treacherous, and there can be a lot of undulations


to them. It will be very exciting be- cause the greens are more severe than the Shore Course.” The State Am was fi rst con- ducted in 1912, when the champi- onship was staged at Del Monte Golf Course. After Pebble Beach opened in 1919, the event prompt- ly moved there. Not surprisingly, Pebble Beach co-designer Jack Neville has won a record fi ve championships, two more than J.J. McHugh, and three more than 12 others—the most recent of those being Casey Boyns. (Addi- tional two-time winners include the late Michael Brannan, Ken Ven- turi and Bobby Clampett, among others). The other co-designer of Pebble Beach, Douglas Grant, is tied for the most medalist honors with three.


Pebble Beach was the host of the championship through 2006, with the exception of 2000, when it was moved to Bayonet and Black Horse because of the U.S. Open. But since 2006, the State Am has rotated around to some of the best courses in Northern and Southern California. MPCC was the fi rst new venue to host the State Am, and the facility just three miles up the road from Pebble Beach provided a memorable championship. While medalist Blake Trimble turned in an impressive 3-under 141 to beat the fi eld by fi ve shots, there was a 10-man playoff for fi ve spots at 10-over 154 to qualify for match play. That total of 154 is six strokes higher than any qualifying score since the State Am began alternating between the North and South in 2007. Others to host the State Am include Lake- side GC (2008), Lake Merced GC (2009), Rancho Santa Fe (2010), The Olympic Club (2011) and La Cumbre (2012).


One of those 10 players battling for fi ve spots was Ander- son, who tripped up No. 2-seed


Since 2006, the State Am has rotated around to some of the best courses in Northern and Southern California.


50 / NCGA.ORG / SPRING 2013


PHOTO: LC LAMBRECHT


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84