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NCGA J


Hall of Fame Inducts Third Class


ohnny Miller, Roger Maltbie and Kay Cockerill all forged battle-tested games by playing amateur golf in Northern California.


After sharpening their games at courses such as The Olympic Club, San Jose Country Club and Pasatiempo, they each ascended to the professional ranks, playing and winning on golf’s biggest stages. They are still a part of golf’s biggest stages, although now it is through their distinct and ongoing broadcast careers. For their accomplishments on and off the course, Miller, Maltbie and Cockerill were inducted into the NCGA Hall of Fame in early February during AT&T week.


It was with their unique perspective as elite players who continue to have close ties to today’s greats that they were able to share fascinating insights about the game they love during the Hall of Fame inductions. Miller, Maltbie


and Cockerill join the first class of Ken Venturi, Frank “Sandy” Tatum, C. Grant Spaeth and Jack Bariteau, and the second class of the Pebble Beach Company’s Clint Eastwood, Arnold Palmer, Dick Ferris and Peter Ueberroth, and Marion Hollins as NCGA Hall of Famers.


52 / NCGA.ORG / SPRING 2013


Johnny Miller>The World Golf Hall of Famer won 25 times on the PGA Tour and captured two majors. He shot a record 63 in the final round of the 1973 U.S. Open to roar back from six strokes down and capture his first major, and the following three years he enjoyed a run that few in the game have ever touched. From 1974-76, Miller won 14 times, including the 1976 British Open. He was the 1974 Player of the Year and money leader, notching eight victories, a feat that wouldn’t be topped until Tiger Woods won nine times in 2000. “My trouble was by the time the


U.S. Open was over, I was ready to go fishing,” admitted Miller. But that run was truly remarkable,


as Maltbie can attest. The first two weeks Maltbie played on the PGA Tour during his rookie year, he was proud to boast that he made the cut both times. Miller won both those tournaments in 1975, beating Maltbie by a combined 45 strokes. “What I think is good, and what is,


are two different things,” Maltbie re- members thinking after watching Miller in his prime. Miller’s career began in San Francis-


co, where he was a junior Olympic Club member. He won the San Francisco City Junior Title at age 16 in 1963, the U.S. Junior Amateur in 1964 and the Cali- fornia State Amateur in 1968. The BYU All-American’s playing career fittingly came full circle and back to Northern California when he stepped out of the announcers booth to win for the final time on the PGA Tour at the 1994 Pebble Beach Pro-Am at the age of 46. To golf ’s younger generations, Miller


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