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But the chill in the air is


offset by the slight boost in altitude, making the 6,910- yard par 72 play to its sea- level length. And Lake Shastina, which opened 40 years ago as one of the last courses Robert Trent Jones Sr. and Jr. designed to- gether, welcomes play with its inviting fairways that funnel into small and subtle greens, embodying the Jonesian philosophy that each hole should be an easy bogey, but a challenging par. The greens are armored


with Jones’ distinct bunker- ing—albeit with a unique, mountain-fl avored twist. The eye-catching bunkers glow a red cinder—a volcanic, gravely texture that plays like heavy sand. “We’re in the middle


of nowhere, so to get sand in here, it was a cost issue,”


Graves said. “But as far as playability, it plays nice.” Cinder is readily availably


around Mount Shasta, which last erupted in the 1780s. (For the last 4,500 years, Mount Shasta has been on a cycle of erupting every 600 years, so plan that golf vaca- tion before 2380.) Jones Jr. smiles fondly


when recalling his work at the remote Lake Shastina, al- though he also chuckles when remembering his 10-year-old son getting sick on a plane ride during one of their visits to the mountainous site. “I’m a three-dimensional


architect,” Jones said. “I got my teeth cut out here in California with my dad, and watched him when he did Spyglass Hill. You have to deal with elevation change. It’s an added dimension to the game architecturally, and players





GOLF AROUND SHASTA


Lake Shastina Golf Resort Green fees: $35-$61 Golf shop: 530/938-3205 Website: www.lakeshastinagolf.com





Mount Shasta Resort Green fees: $30-$75 Golf shop: 530/926-3052 Website: www.mountshastaresort.com





Weed Golf Course Green fees: $10-$24 Golf shop: 530/938-9971 Website: www.weedgolfcourse.com





McCloud Golf Club Green fees: $14-$25 Golf shop: 530/964-2535 Website: www.mccloudgolfclub.com





Shasta Valley Golf Club Green fees: $15-25 Golf shop: 530/842-2302


(left and below) Mount Shasta Resort


have to add that into their shot selections. They have to think about not only the wind, the length of the shot and the value of their club, but the change of elevation.” After blasting an open- ing tee shot toward Mount Shasta—always an impressive visual, no matter how well or poorly the ball is struck—Lake Shastina meanders through the forest for the next fi ve holes. While this produces some of the more beautiful and peaceful holes on the course, it would be wise to keep the head cover on that driver until there is an unobstructed view of Mount Shasta. Of course, even if Mount


Shasta is hidden from view, it is always felt. Putts fi nd a way to fall off away from the peak whenever possible. From the seventh hole on, the course alternates views between Mount Shasta and Mount Eddy. The routing is somewhat similar to the origi- nal Poppy Hills, another Jones design, with back-to-back par 5s on Nos. 9 and 10, and a mix of three par 3s, three par 4s and three par 5s on the closing nine. The par-3 13th is perhaps the signature hole, a pictur- esque downhill drop shot through a wooded chute, over a pond that guards the front of the green. While dry right now, the meadow behind the green can also be fi lled by the outer reachings of Lake Shastina. “We don’t have signature


holes,” Jones reminded. “We wrote our name on the whole course.” Jones punctuates Lake


Shastina with an exclamation point, as the fi nishing hole is a par 5 that once again uses Mount Shasta as its backdrop, highlighting the ball as it seemingly soars forever. While Graves calls the winter and spring “hole-in- one season” because the colder temperatures lead to fi rmer conditions and more shots that roll up to the green—and apparently into the hole—a


30 / NCGA.ORG / SPRING 2013


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