This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
our best recipes to


www.ok-living.coop/contests by Feb. 15, 2013!


Coming Fall 2013!


Submission does not guarantee inclusion in the cookbook.


Submit your best recipes at www.ok-living.coop/contests by Feb. 15, 2013


Let’s Help Oklahoma Living Magazine!!


You were so great to help us here at Harmon Electric get our 75th Anniversary cookbook fi lled with wonderful recipes. Because of your help we collected over 300 recipes! Everything has been sent to press and the cookbook will be printed and ready to hand out at your 75th Annual Meeting on April 5th! Oklahoma Living magazine, our statewide publication is now compiling a cookbook as part of the publication’s 65th anniversary celebration. The cookbook, which will include reader-submitted recipes as well as historic recipes from the magazine’s archives, will be approximately 160 pages, full color and hardbound.


“Our readers are so valuable to us, and we’re thrilled to invite them to take part in this special opportunity as we celebrate six-and-a-half decades of publishing our magazine,” Anna Politano, Oklahoma Living managing editor said.


Recipes can be submitted online at http://ok-living.coop/contests/?page=submitrecipe or by mail to Oklahoma Living magazine, PO Box 54309, OKC, OK 73154-1309


Look Up & Stay Alert During Outdoor Work & Play


conductor of electricity. Obey signs that say “danger” and “keep out” around


large electrical equipment, like substations. These signs aren’t warnings; they’re commands to keep you safe.


Never climb a power pole. For adults:


If power lines run through your trees, call Harmon Electric—professional tree trimmers with proper protective equipment can trim branches safely. Remember that power lines and other utilities run Have utility lines marked before you


underground, too.


start digging. Starting that winter cleanup yard work? Sweep dried leaves and debris from outdoor receptacles. Consider upgrading your outdoor receptacles, or any


Remember to stay away from downed lines; you can’t tell if electricity is still fl owing through them.


As the weather begins to warm up, kids and adults alike


will soon head outside. Before they do, remind them to look up and be aware of power lines and other electrical hazards to avoid electrocution—and even death. “Here at Harmon Electric, using proper procedures and


safety measures is a matter of life & death,” explains Monty Worthen, safety coordinator. “We take safety seriously at home, too. Accidents happen, but if we educate ourselves


and our children, we can keep them to a minimum.”


For kids: Never fl y a kite on a rainy day and fl y only in open


spaces. A kite is a grounding point for lightning. Kites can also easily become tangled in power lines. Don’t climb trees that are near power lines and poles. Stay far away from power lines lying on the ground.


You can’t tell if electricity is still fl owing through them. If there’s water nearby, don’t go in it. Water is the best


Your heat pump can use 10 percent to 25 percent more energy if it’s not properly maintained, which includes regularly checking and replacing the air


lter when it’s dirty


to keep parts from working too hard or even becoming damaged. Keep brush and plants tidy around the outdoor unit, and dust the return registers inside. For more details on he


on heat pump maintenance, visit EnergySavers.gov.


outlets that could come in contact with water, to ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs). GFCIs immediately interrupt power fl ow when a plugged-in device comes in contact with water. Regardless, keep your outlets and cords dry and covered outside. Use only weather-resistant, heavy-duty extension cords marked for outdoor use. Don’t leave outdoor power tools unattended for curious children or animals to fi nd. For more safety tips and information, visit SafeElectricity.org.


Sources: Electrical Safety Foundation International, Safe Electricity Oklahoma


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