This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Commentary Oklahoma’s Glenn English retiring as NRECA CEO A


Chris Meyers General Manager, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


t the end of this month Oklahoma’s own Glenn


English will step down af- ter 19 years as the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s (NRECA) CEO. He has done a terrifi c job in that capacity. We also


have the pleasure of claiming him as a former member and leader in Congress, representing western Oklahoma’s 6th Congressional District from 1975 to 1994—another 19 years. As Oklahomans we can be proud of one of our own making such a signifi cant contribution to our state and nation, while rising to the top leadership position of the electric cooperative program. He has been a champion for rural Americans his entire career. While in Congress he served on the House Agriculture Committee and as chairman of the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Conservation, Credit, and Rural Development. As Committee chairman, Glenn worked directly on legislation affecting rural development programs, including rural electrifi cation and telecommunica- tions, and pursued an aggressive agenda to revital- ize the economy of America’s rural communities. As the NRECA CEO, Glenn has aggressively de- fended the nation’s 900-plus electric cooperatives and actively promoted the cooperative business


model as a solution to many of the nation’s prob- lems. Never forgetting the driving spirit of rural electrifi cation, he has kept lawmakers and regula- tors focused on “putting consumers fi rst” and keep- ing electric bills affordable during debates over freight rail reform, wholesale power competition, electric deregulation, and energy and climate change policy.


Being the CEO of NRECA has been very de- manding of his time. Despite those pressures, dur- ing the past year he made the special efforts to travel back to his roots and home in Cordell, Okla., to be keynote speaker at the Kiwash Electric Cooperative’s Annual Meeting. He followed that with comments at Northfork Electric Cooperative’s Annual Meeting in Sayre, Okla., and earlier last year at the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperative’s Annual Meeting in Oklahoma City. His dedication to his friends in Oklahoma is strong. It’s been my honor to have the opportunity to work closely with Glenn. He has tremendous en- ergy, is results-driven, and has demonstrated time and time again his passion for the electric coopera- tive program. He has certainly earned the opportu- nity to slow down, enjoy family, and pursue other interests in the next phase of his life. Your friend and mine, Glenn English, has made us proud. Oklahoma’s Electric Cooperatives have always felt a special connection to him. We wish him the very best.


Helping ideas become more powerful E


Glenn Propps President, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


very spring, many Oklahomans start planning for their vegetable gardens.


Timing, it seems, is every- thing. Plant too early and a late frost could wipe out seedlings; plant too late and buds may not have time to


take root and produce a crop. Without the nour- ishment of water and the protection of a strong root system, most vegetables can’t survive an Oklahoma summer.


Interestingly, great ideas are the same. If an idea is shared too early without community support, it gets lost in the shuffl e. If you lobby for an idea no one knows about—even for something that would seemingly help everyone—lack of interest may cause the idea to wilt and die.


How do great ideas thrive? They need grassroots support.


At the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC), we’re looking out for you, making sure you have affordable, reliable, and safe


4 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP


electricity. Sometimes state or federal laws and/or regulations complicate our efforts, so we lobby hard on your behalf. But without your support, our ideas and solutions may not reach the right ears. No matter how loudly we speak out on how leg- islation or agency rulings may impact electric bills, our voice dims in comparison to one of the most untapped resources in our community—YOU. We’re a statewide association—YOU are a voter. While we work hard on your behalf, your support helps our ideas take root and survive—and thrive. Would you like to help your electric co-op build


a deeper grassroots base? Go to www.ourenergy. coop and sign up for e-mail alerts when your voice needs to be heard to keep your electric bill affordable.


OAEC and our 30 electric cooperative member systems across the state are committed to powering your community and empowering you to improve your quality of life. We work closely with political leaders and want to arm you with the tools—and ideas—needed to help us plant deeper grassroots. Learn more at: www.oaec.coop. And remember: we’re powering the needs of new generations.


Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


Chris Meyers, General Manager Glenn Propps, President Joe Harris, Vice-President


Jimmy Taylor, Secretary-Treasurer Staff


Sid Sperry, Director of PR & Communications sksperry@oaec.coop


Anna Politano, Managing Editor editor@ok-living.coop


Larry Skoch, Advertising Manager lskoch@ok-living.coop


Christy Johnson, Offi ce Manager cjohnson@oaec.coop


Kirbi Bailey, Accountant/Offi ce Manager Asst. kbailey@oaec.coop


Hayley Leatherwood, Multimedia Specialist hleatherwood@ok-living.coop


Meg McElhaney, Intern oklintern@gmail.com


Editorial, Advertising and General Offi ces


P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309 Phone (405) 478-1455


Oklahoma Living online: www.ok-living.coop Subscriptions


$3.12 per year for rural electric cooperative members.


$6.00 per year for non-members. Cooperative Members: Report change of


address to your local rural electric cooperative. Non-Cooperative Members: Send address


changes to Oklahoma Living, P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309.


Oklahoma Living (ISSN 1064-8968),


USPS 407-040, is published monthly for consumer-members of Oklahoma’s rural electric cooperatives by the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, 2325 E. I-44 Service Road,


P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309. Circulation this issue: 316,323


Periodical postage paid at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Association of Electric


Cooperatives is a statewide service organization for the following electric cooperatives: Alfalfa, Arkansas Valley, Caddo, Canadian Valley,


Central Rural, Choctaw, Cimarron, Cookson Hills, Cotton, East Central Oklahoma, Harmon, Indian, KAMO Power, Kay, Kiamichi, Kiwash, Lake Region, Northeast Oklahoma, Northfork,


Northwestern, Oklahoma, Ozarks, People’s, Red River Valley, Rural, Southeastern, Southwest


Rural, Tri-County, Verdigris Valley, and Western Farmers Electric Cooperative.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156