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meet our members Do you need a storm shelter?


Get one delivered and installed on your property for less than $50/month. Place your order now and beat the seasonal rush!


F


ebruary is not too soon to be thinking about storm shelters. With Choctaw Electric Cooperative’s storm shelter financing, a safe, in-ground storm shelter is now affordable for members who never dreamed they could afford one.


Jennifer Boling, coordinator of the storm shelter loan program, said the cost to purchase, deliver and install a new storm shelter can run as little as $45.99 per month, depending on the area. “With six percent interest and terms of 36, 48, 60 or 72 months, most members can find an option that fits their budget,” she said.


Boling reminded members that spring and summer are busy months. ‘Better to pur- chase one now and beat the rush,” she said.


CEC members can choose from two types of storm shelters that are manu- factured by two different companies.


Hausner storm shelters are made of precast concrete reinforced with fiber and steel rebar. They are available in two sizes: 6 ft by 8 ft, or 6’10 ft by 10 ft. Prices include


double handrail on steps, gas operated door closure, eight-inch turbine and six-inch vent. A 10 year warranty against leaks is included. To view the Hausner shelters, go to www. gohausner.com.


Storm shelters by Security Tornado Shelters are made of solid, poured-in- place concrete that require two days to install. Shelters offer indoor-outdoor carpet, circular bench, inside and outside handrails, a solid 12 gauge steel door with Scorpion bed liner, three way lock, and two vents. An electric box is installed, but power or hookup is not included in the price. Inside shelter height is 6.5 feet, and customers may choose from a variety of interior colors. There is a 10 year warranty against leaks or seepage included.


For details on storm shelter designs, prices or financing, please call Jennifer Boling at 800-780-6486, ext. 207, or visit www.choctawelectric.coop.


JIMMY NOAH


Jimmy Noah lives northeast of Antlers in Pushmataha County. A co-op member since 1979, Noah is also lifelong resident of southeast Oklahoma and an avid hunter and fisherman. His biggest catfish yet? 68 lbs.


FEBRUARY


Meter Reading and Billing Dates


ENERGY EFFICIENCY Tip of the Month


Your heat pump can use 10 percent to 25 percent more energy if it’s not properly maintained. That means regularly checking and replacing the air fil- ter when it’s dirty to keep parts from working too hard or even becoming damaged. Keep brush and plants tidy around the outdoor unit, and dust the return registers inside. For more details on heat pump maintenance, visit EnergySavers.gov.


—U.S. Department of Energy


Cycle C-1 C-2 C-3 C-4


Read 2/1 2/8


2/15 2/22


Bill 2/7


2/14 2/21 2/28


Due 2/28 3/7


3/14 3/21


The billing chart above includes meter reading dates. Keeping track of meter reading dates allows you to evaluate your electrical usage over a precise billing period. We hope this will clear up billing questions.


Please see your electric bill for the current Power Cost Adjustment (PCA).


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