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Page 3


Restoring Service Continued from page 1.


impending event, we put our people and several outside contractors on notice. The staff may also review our emergency ac- tion plan if there is time. Once we begin experiencing outages, an assessment is made of the scope of the damage. We also try to assess the potential for ad- ditional damage as the storm progresses. An ice storm can cycle several times before it subsides and can do an incred- ible amount of damage. In the midst of the storm, restoration efforts can prove to be futile but we can’t help ourselves, we typically try anyway.


Electricity originates miles away at


the generator. It travels down high volt- age transmission lines to a distribution substation. At the substation, there are typically several distribution feeders that extend out from the substation for several miles. From these distribution feeders we connect to smaller branch circuits and then individual customers. The process of restoring power first and foremost involves the safety of our people and the general public. 907161102 Once we have ensured that it is safe to proceed, and we determine that we have power at the sub- station, we begin restoring power in the following order: First are the distribution feeders, next are critical loads (hospitals, nursing homes, etc.), then the branch circuits, next are individuals with spe- cial needs (medical necessity, etc.), and finally the rest of us. Obviously a lot of individual customers will come on when we restore a main feeder line, but we will not begin repairing individual services until the main lines are back on. With every task, we are trying to restore as many people as we can. It doesn’t make much sense to tie up time and resources to restore power to an individual when there are hundreds who can be restored for the same effort.


I hope we never have to activate our


emergency action plan, but the reality is, we were lucky this time. Next time, our luck may not hold.


The ElectraLite Statement of Non-Discrimination Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative, Incorporated is the recipi-


ent of Federal financial assistance from the Rural Development Utilities Programs, an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provision of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, the Americans with Disabili- ties Act, and the rules and regulations of the United States Department of Agriculture, which provide that no person in the United States on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or handicap shall be excluded from participation in, admission to, access to, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any of this organization’s programs or activities. The person responsible for coordinating this organization’s non-dis-


crimination compliance efforts is Gail Fipps, Manager of Administration and Finance. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feels this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further in- formation about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250; or the Administra- tor, Rural Development Utilities Programs, Washington, D.C. 20250. Com- plaints must be filed within 180 days after the alleged discrimination. Con- fidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible.


General Manager George E. Hand


Find Your Hidden Account Number and Win $25


If you find your account number hidden in this issue of The Electralite, you could win $25.


In order to win, the account number must be your


own. You need to report finding the number to us by the 15th of the month.


And you need to report finding it by phone, mail or in person.


Good luck! By George Continued from page 2.


to run our air-conditioners when the temperature is above 100 degrees and the electric peaks are running wild. Systems that use less peak demand to keep us cool benefit everyone in the form of fewer new electric power plants.


Rebates will be discontinued for air to air heat pump systems as these systems have not proved as effective at controlling peak demand usage as implied by the manufacturer’s energy ratings. We will continue to rebate on the ground source (Geo- energy) systems. These systems more efficiently use electric energy and reduce peak energy demand. That is a win-win for customers and utilities. There is a problem and that is the initial cost of the ground source systems in our mobile society. Today you need to live in the home at least seven or eight years to get the benefit. Many or most do not. We are looking for a way to encourage the installation of more ground source systems in the real world. There is a lot more to this story. More to come.


February 2013


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