This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Capitol Art Continued from Page 11


• Livestock Barns • Hay Barns • Shops • Garages


40x60x12


1-walk door, 1 sliding door colored metal $


13,50000 30x40x10 garage


1-walk door, 2 overhead door 13,70000


frameouts, 4” concrete floor $


24x30x10 w/concrete floor one entry door, two windows, one overhead door frameout, fully insulated, $


12,50000 Variety of sizes available.


– 16 years in business, 26 years total experience


– 40 year warranty on metal – 5 year warranty on material and labor


– Pad leveling and concrete floors – Insured


Hiring exp. barn builders


TOLL FREE


p


D CROSS BARN COMPANY Statewide Service


re h BUILDINGS


POST FRAME


Another outstanding contributor to art in the Capitol is former Senator Charles Ford, Tulsa. Ford, who served many years in the House of Representatives before be- coming a senator, remembers, “I thought that after we spent the money we did re- storing the senate lounge and chamber in 1993 that we needed some outstanding art. I personally donated a painting (Washington Irving Meeting the Osage by Wayne Cooper) and it kind of snowballed.”


Thanks to the Oklahoma State Senate Historical Preservation Fund started by the Senator Ford, 136 pieces have been added to the collection and another painting, a portrait of T. Boone Pickens, will be dedi- cated this month.


Many others—governors, legislators, citi- zens and corporations—have contributed to the beautification of the Capitol. One name, however, keeps recurring—Betty Price. For her untiring efforts, the legisla- ture in 2008, renamed the gallery that houses the Oklahoma State Art Collection, the Betty Price Gallery.


Today’s Visitor


A brochure available in the Capitol Visitor Center (south side, first floor) will help you hit the art high- lights in the building. If you start on the fifth floor, you’ll find four large paintings: White Tail Deer in Choctaw County, Creek Council Oak Tree, Game Birds at Glass Mountain and The Tall Grass Prairie Reserve. This floor is where you’ll get the


•32 Varieties including Pawnee & Kanza • Will Trade For Guns


Book Orders Now 580-345-2821


•Due to high demand & limited supply


best view of three lunettes: semi- circular paintings tucked into archi- tectural arches. Oklahoma Black Gold salutes the oil industry; We Belong to the Land honors our agri- cultural heritage. Perhaps the most popular painting in the building is Flight of Spirit, honoring Oklahoma’s five Native American ballerinas. The fourth floor features portraits of great Oklahomans: from well-known figures like Will Rogers to those, like Mrs. Lamar Looney, Oklahoma’s first female state senator, whose names are not as familiar. It’s here that you’ll see Charles Banks Wilson’s magnificent murals—a timeline of Oklahoma history from 1541 to state- hood. It took six years for the artist to research the subjects, create clay models of each scene, paint the four, 13 by 27-foot linen canvases, and then mount them on the curved sur- face of the rotunda. You’ll also find many more paint-


Free Delivery 100 Mile Radius


22 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP Seminole, OK www.minitrucksbs.com


ings of historical moments in Oklahoma history. In Ceremonial Transfer of the Louisiana Purchase in New Orleans – 1803, look for the gentleman who has dozed off. And,


beneath the painting of Napoleon, models for the couple standing were Mr. and Mrs. Henry Primeaux who un- derwrote the painting. In Theodore Roosevelt Signing Proclamation, the face of the reporter is actually Wimmer’s. The highlight of the second floor is Wilson Hurley’s Centennial Suite. These four paintings represent four areas of the state. The Governor’s Gallery features changing exhibits by Oklahoma artists while the Hall of Governors honors those men— Governor Fallin isn’t there yet— who’ve held the state’s highest office. The first floor has a mix of perma-


nent and changing exhibits. Kids en- joy cuddling up to the seated sculpture of Kate Barnard, elected to statewide office before women could vote. Everyone, and quilters in par- ticular, loves the brilliant colors of Nettie Wallace’s Indian Blanket Quilt. The north and east halls host tempo- rary exhibits by Oklahoma artists and photographers. The west wing’s Betty Price Gallery houses the State Art Collection. Begun by the Oklahoma Arts Council in 1971, the collection comprises over 200 works by Oklahoma artists. The story of Oklahoma, its people,


land and history, is told through the art of the Capitol. As Senator Ford expressed, “I’ve been in 38 different state capitols over the years. Ours isn’t the most opulent, but there’s none more beautiful.”


Pa P


n


a


e


r S T


e e s


l e c


l


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156