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C A N A D I A N FEBRUARY 2013


V SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING By George


I often have people call or bring up a subject associated with electricity or en- ergy in general. It is not uncommon for them to say something like, “You should write about that (whatever the subject is) in the Electralite.” To myself I usually think, “I have already done that, probably more than once.” Usually I am wrong and I have not or it has been a very long time.


How CVEC Restores Service Following a Major Outage


Well, Christmas has passed and we just dodged the bullet on what could have been another significant storm. It seems as though large weather events are far more frequent than they used to be, and their impact is greater because we all are so dependent on our power. At my home, if I lose power, I am without everything including my water.


by Cordis Slaughter CVEC Manager of Operations


Have you ever wondered how we restore power in a large event? Well, it’s not easy but there is a method to the madness. If we have some warning of an


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During this past month I was visit- ing with one of our members who is very energy conscientious and concerned not only about controlling the size of her electric bill, but also about wisely and efficiently using all forms of energy. She has had a ground-source heat pump (Geo-energy heating system) in her home for a number of years so we had some- thing in common to talk about. She had a problem with one of the small pumps which enables her Geo-energy system to not only heat and cool her home but also produce her domestic hot water needs. In fact this hot water production is “free” in the summer time when the Geo-energy system is cooling the home by remov- ing heat and “dumping” it into the earth. Instead of removing the summer heat from the home, the system first puts as much of the removed heat as possible into the home’s hot water tank. In the winter time when the Geo-energy system is taking heat from the earth and warm- ing the home, the system still makes hot water for the home. This costs less than running electric current through a heating element to make hot water. This member’s problem was that while the heating and cooling system was still taking care of the home, it had stopped making hot water. She had called a repair man who had told her that one of the small pumps that circulated the water and heat to the water tank had


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