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LIVEWIRE | PAGE 3


Tips for the use of a Programmable Thermostat


CEO VIEW CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE


With these improvements and the oil fi eld growth, I can safely say this year will be one of the busiest construction years on record for the cooperative, with the exception of past years with storm damage repairs.


The projected system investments will take place across our system’s territory, including Beaver, Cimarron, and Texas Counties.


I


n most homes, heating and cooling costs are the largest part of energy bills. Staying comfortable as effi ciently as possible is an excellent way to conserve energy and reduce bills. Programmable thermostats can help do this. However, the Energy Education Council wants consumers to know that programmable thermostats must be used properly to achieve any benefi t.


A programmable thermostat works by changing the temperature depending on your work and sleep schedules. When done correctly, your house will be at a comfortable temperature when you return home or wake up. The only difference you will notice is on your utility bill.


The Energy Education Council has the following tips for better results with a programmable thermostat:


• Only adjust the thermostat for long periods of time—around 8 hours.


• Do not micromanage the thermostat. Pick a temperature for when you are at home and for when you are away. Stick with these temperatures. Frequently adjusting the thermostat increases energy costs.


• Do not create large temperature swings. Adjust the temperature 5 to 8 degrees when you are away from home or sleeping. If you change the thermostat too drastically, your home’s heating/cooling system will have to work longer to return your home to a comfortable temperature, running up your energy costs.


• If your home has a heat pump system, you should set your thermostat to run at a constant temperature in the winter in order for your heat pump to perform at its best. You can still make use of a programmable thermostat’s settings in the summer months though. There are some programmable thermostats that are specifi cally designed to work with heat pump systems. If you are interested in one, you should contact an HVAC technician.


For more tips on energy effi ciency at home, visit EnergyEdCouncil.org. n Source: SafeElectricity.org


The benefi ts these investments bring to our cooperative and our members are too numerous to mention. Some of these investments were identifi ed for safety reasons, some to improve quality, others to increase capacity and all of them increase the reliability and stability of the power we deliver.


These improvements are necessary for several reasons, but the overarching reason is so we can deliver safe, reliable electric service at the lowest price allowed by good management practices.


Sure, our reliability numbers have been good in the past. These system investments will make them exceptional. Some outages are due to causes beyond our control, but these improvements increase reliability and signifi cantly reduce outages wherever possible.


Above all, Tri-County Electric is a cooperative owned by its members. Although we may not see increased revenue from all these improvements, delivering safe, reliable and affordable power is the bottom line. That’s our vision at Tri-County Electric. n


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