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INDIRECT COSTS


INDIRECT COSTS (TECHNICAL SUPPLEMENT)


SHORT-TERM WORK LOSSES Table 1 lists the nine studies that report data on short-term work losses.85


Most studies used


different reporting time periods (for example, work loss over 4 weeks or over 6 months). This required some adjustment for the results to be in a standard format: the number of days missed per person per year. The diversity in the collection and reporting of results required a meta-analysis to determine an average estimate of the expected sick leave per employed person with IBD.


On average, 43% of employed people with IBD took time off work per year, and each employed person with IBD took 7.2 days off per year due to IBD. These papers reported an average rate of employment of 60%; this is almost identical to the labour participation reported by people with IBD in Manitoba.97


To convert this to a Canadian cost, the total number of days lost per person were multiplied by the number of people with disease, the percentage in active employment, and the mean daily wage rate.


The average wage rate was determined from Statistics Canada while the number of people with disease was obtained from this report (Section 3). In 2012, the national average weekly wage rate was $897.72 (or $179.54 per day).98


work losses due to IBD in 2012. Table 2: Short-Term Work Losses Due to IBD, Canada 2012


Number of days of sick leave per employed person with IBD Average daily wage rate in 2012


Cost of short-term work losses per employed person with IBD Employment rate in people with IBD


Number of persons with IBD in Canada in 2012 Estimated number of employed persons with IBD


Total annual cost of short-term work losses (140,000 employed persons at $1,292.86 per person per year)


7.2 days $179.54


$1,292.86 60%


233,000 140,000


$181 million See Figure 2 for an analysis of the short-term


THE IMPACT OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE IN CANADA 61


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