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EPIDEMIOLOGY


Figure 10: Pediatric IBD – Incidence per 100,000 in Ontario, 2005 30


25


20


15


10


5


0 6 mo - 4 yrs 5-9 years 10-14 years Females Benchimol 2009 key findings:


• IBD had a prevalence of 56.3/100,000 in Ontario in 2005, using a strict case definition and limited to children below the age of 18. There are more boys with IBD than girls. This is one of the highest rates of childhood-onset IBD in the world.


• Incidence has been rising, particularly since 2001, and significantly so in children under the age of 10.


• In 2005, there were 1,621 children living with IBD in Ontario, of whom 327 had new diagnoses of IBD that year.


• Updating these results to 2012 and extrapolating to the rest of the country, it is estimated that there may be 5,900 children under 18 years old with IBD in Canada.


International Comparison


Overall, Canada has among the highest reported prevalence and incidence of IBD in the world.


Historically, countries in more northerly latitudes have a higher occurrence of both CD and UC.6


There is more disease in the developed countries of northern Europe and North America


than in southern Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America. This may explain why BC has a substantially lower rate of CD than the rest of Canada – it has given more residents of recent Asian immigration. As noted earlier, children of South Asian immigrants may have a high occurrence of IBD, as the effect of the environment serves to “catch up” this population to the much-higher Canadian average.36


THE IMPACT OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE IN CANADA 38


15-17 years 6 mo - 4 yrs 5-9 years 10-14 years Males 15-17 years


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