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EPIDEMIOLOGY


Figure 1: CCHS Survey – Prevalence per 100,000 Population, CD and UC31 1200 UC 1000 CD 800


600


400


200


0 NF PE CCHS Survey 2005 key findings from 2005 Canadian


Community Health Survey: • Approximately 206,000 Canadians reported having CD or UC out of the 27 million sampled for the survey; that is, 758 cases per 100,000, or 0.76% of the population. Based on these self-reported data, UC was more common than CD. However, self- report data are typically an overestimate.


• UC was more common than CD, both nationally and in most regions (except QC, NS and NF). There were estimated to be 113,000 cases of UC and 92,000 cases of CD.


• There were large differences between provinces, particularly in less populous provinces where a random sample could generate a less precise estimate.


Canadian IBD Epidemiology Database Study


A landmark study was conducted by Canadian researchers to estimate the prevalence and incidence of CD and UC in Canada.30


Funded by the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of


Canada, this study was led by researchers in Manitoba, who had first developed and tested a case definition which was capable of selecting almost all of the people with the disease of interest (sensitivity) but almost none of the people without the disease (specificity).32


The


definition of a case was someone who had at least five health system contacts (outpatient visit or hospitalization) recorded for IBD. For people who were registered in the health system for less than two years, this was reduced to three contacts. There were five provinces that participated; all provinces had at least thirteen years of records available. Results are estimated as of July 1, 2000 and are presented in Figure 2.


NS NB QC ON MB SK AB BC Territories National


THE IMPACT OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE IN CANADA 30


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