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2 Kilowatt  DECEMBER 2012 the INSIDE YOUR CO-OP


A Touchstone Energy Cooperative


Kiwash Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Providing the service


that lights up your life.


Office Location PO Box 100


120 W. 1st Street


Cordell, Oklahoma (888) 832-3362


www.kiwash.coop


Find us on Facebook Staff


Dennis Krueger manager


Wendy Putman director of finance


Lisa Willard director of communications


Roy Dewees director of operations


Board of Trustees officers


Jack Sawatzky president


Robert Travis vice president


Virginia Walker sec.-treasurer


John Schaufele


asst. sec.-treasurer directors


Ralph Cunningham Leslie Hinds Rex Eagan


Finding solutions to energy problems Like it or not, the real energy debate begins at home


T


he elections are over and the national focus now turns to


answering tough questions with sound solutions. Will new policies be implemented that push stiffer rules on environmental issues? How do you solve the economic woes of the country? Will a 20 percent carbon tax rear its ugly head in the attempt to reduce the  tax credits incentives be expanded or dropped? We cannot predict the answers to these questions; however, we can begin to think of ways to reduce our own energy dependency in our homes and businesses.


landscape. They are also quieter and improve humidity control.


HOW A GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP WORKS.


reversed, it can be used to cool a building.


For a home or business owners who are serious about saving energy, a GHP system offers tremendous 


Geothermal heat pumps (GHP), also known as ground source heat pumps (GSHP) are used in buildings for heating and cooling purposes. The heat pump pipes are inserted into the ground taking advantage of the ground’s constant temperature— between 50°


F. to 70° F. depending on


the latitude— throughout the year. In this way, GHP systems can be used to control the temperature of a home or building.


 warms up while circulating through underground pipes and transfers the heat inside the building. The colder liquid inside the building is then transferred back into the ground to circulate and warm up again. Similarly, when the GHP system is


• Low operational costs. A GHP system can save up to 70 percent of the heating costs of a building.


• Low yearly maintenance costs and long life expectancy. A typical GHP system’s life is estimated to be 25 years for the components inside the building and more than 50 years for the pipes inside the ground.


• No environmental impact. The   environmentally friendly system available for heating and cooling.


• More attractive. GHP systems don't have large or visible components that clutter your


Before installing a GHP system, certain design factors should be considered such as soil conditions, building size, climate conditions, and whether closed or open loop pipe systems will be used. A typical GHP system may cost more up front but its but low operational costs begin immediately. The cost of a typical GHP system can vary from  payback period of three to 10 years.


Solutions to our nation's problems are never easy. While politicians in Washington D.C. debate the issues on the federal level, only you and I can solve the energy dependency issue in our own homes.


I think it's time we think about energy conservation in a new light. The solution might be installing  more attic insulation, or investing in a geothermal unit. It could be as simple as installing CFL light bulbs throughout your home or making minor adjustments to your thermostat. Whatever course of action you choose, the most important thing is to do something. Like it or not, the real energy debate begins at home!


For more information on heat pumps, please visit the Department of Energy (http://www.energy.gov) and search "Geothermal."


By Dennis Krueger general manager


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