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Page 2 C A N A D I A N V A L L E Y


P.O. Box 751 Seminole, Okla. 74818 Serving Hughes, Lincoln, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Pottawatomie, Seminole and portions of Oklahoma, Cleveland and Creek counties


ELECTRALITE By George cont.


Main Office and Headquarters Interstate 40 at the Prague/Seminole Exit


Area Office


35 W JC Watts Street, Eufaula Office Hours


8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday -Friday Board of Trustees


President— Yates Adcock, Dustin .............................District 8 Vice President — Joe Semtner, Konawa ...................District 6 Secretary-Tres.—Robert Schoenecke, Meeker ..........District 2 Asst. Sec/Treas. — Steve Marak, Meeker ................District 1 Gary Crain, Prague.....................................................District 3 Clayton Eads, Shawnee .............................................District 4 Matt Goodson, Tecumseh ..........................................District 5 J.P. Duvall, Seminole .................................................District 7 George E Hand ...........................................................Manager J. Roger Henson .........................................................Attorney Ann Weaver ...................................................................Editor


Telephone Numbers


Seminole .........................................................(405) 382-3680 Shawnee, Tecumseh, Earlsboro ......................(405) 273-4680 Toll free.............................................................(877)382-3680 Eufaula ........................................................... (918) 689-3232


Read


Cycle 1 Cycle 2 Cycle 3


26th-31st 6th-11th 16th-21st


In Case of Trouble


1. Check for blown fuse or tripped circuit breakers. 2. Check with your neighbors. Ask if their electricity is off and if they have reported it.


3. If not call the office and report the trouble.


Operating Statistics for September 2011


2012


Operating Revenues .......................... Wholesale Cost of Power .................. Percentage WPC is of Revenue .................. Revenue Per Mi of Line: MTD ................ $925.07 Consumers per mile of line:MTD .................. 4.58 KWPeak Demand -This Month ................ 146,000 Billing KW Demand ..................................110,748 KW Peak Demand: YTD .......................... 165,676 KWH Purchased - This Month ............. 59,228,610 Taxes Paid ...............................................


$4,781,712 $3,458,302 72.32


Interest on Long Term Debt ................... $183,313 System Load Factor ......................................


56.3


$4,530,808 $3,365,594 74.28


$874.00 4.60


152,950 115,112 160,468


$110,232


60,625,160 $104,769 $177,448 55.1


New Services Staked in October During the month of October 34 new services were staked. The total new services staked in 2012 is 362. This compares to 393 for the same period in 2011.


FINANCIAL STATEMENT


BEGINNING BALANCE 9/30/12..$176,265.93 Deposits .....................................................8,061.22 Interest Income ..............................................9.23 Checks Issued ........................................ -4,036.01 Approved, not yet paid ........................ -5,270.58 BALANCE 10/31/12........................$175,029.79


Billing date 5th


15th 25th


1-1/2% penalty is applied 20


after billing date


math of a combined assault of a hurricane, the jet stream, and cold front, a fiery inferno and the Atlantic Ocean, I must admit that comparatively, an ice storm is nothing to “whine” about. Dealing with subways full of ocean water three levels down has to be a little overwhelming. It seems as though they think that everything is going to be fine after they pump the water out, but it may take electrically a little more than that to get even transportation running. And in many cases there is a lot more laying in piles than just electric lines.


In the area that was hit by the hurricane, much of the electric utility system is underground. I watched an inter- view with an electric utility worker who was looking into an underground electric vault, mostly filled with water. His comments were of the jest that it may take a while, but we will get it. Corrosive salt water and electrical equipment don’t “play” well together. While some of the underground equipment is sealed much of it cannot be. Even the parts that will come back on initially will likely have future problems. Underground electric utility facilities are not a cure all.


In Oklahoma and most other states that have experienced multiple ice storms, there have been calls for all electric power lines to be put underground. Over the years sev- eral studies have been ordered by regulatory commissions to determine if this is the right approach. 802110500 The result of these studies, as far as I know have all been pretty much the same. First, all lines cannot be effectively put un- derground. But the overriding determinate has been that if you put every electric line underground that you technically could, very few people would be able to afford to pay the cost on their electric bill. So we accept the cost of putting them back up, making them a little stronger than they were. I hope we don’t have an Oklahoma ice storm this year, but we might. The best we as individuals can do is to heed the early warnings that usually come and make arrange- ments to be without electricity, should it come to that. Hurricane Sandy has demonstrated that things can be a lot worse. I will limit my whining.


The ElectraLite


DECEMBER 2012


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