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DEPARTURES FLYING TO...


Pictured: Below: Amman, Jordan; Bottom: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia





Jordan Amman Bordered by Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Syria and Israel, Amman is the business hub of the Levant. One of the world’s oldest cities, it preserves its historic heritage alongside new projects and developments. Growth sectors include construction, banking and finance, and there has been significant investment in transportation. Many large Iraqi companies have their base in Amman, making it an ideal conduit for British businesses unable to travel across the border. Royal Jordanian flies from Heathrow to Amman daily; British Airways six times a week. Lufthansa and Air France depart daily from Frankfurt and Paris CDG respectively.


Kuwait Kuwait City


The Arab Spring demonstrations began in Kuwait in summer 2011 and have centred on calls for government reforms. In an effort to solve the political impasse, the Emir is rumoured to be considering calling fresh elections this year. Meanwhile, the country’s economy is based on the fifth-largest oil reserves in the world, plus shipping, construction, cement and financial services. Both Kuwait Airways and British Airways


fly daily from London Heathrow to Kuwait City. Lufthansa, KLM and Air France each offer the same frequency from Frankfurt, Schiphol and Paris CDG respectively.


Lebanon Beirut


Astute management ensured that the stylish Lebanese capital would escape the worst effects of the financial crisis, and the minor disturbances related to the Arab Spring have failed to upset its stability. Located on the Eastern Mediterranean, its strategic location and the excellent contacts of the business community make Beirut an ideal stepping stone to the markets of the Middle East for exporters new to doing business in the region. The economy is based on a thriving tourism industry, banking and trade. Middle East Airlines offers daily flights from


Heathrow to Beirut, with British Airways flying six times a week. Lufthansa has 12 weekly services out of Frankfurt, plus three a week from Berlin, while Air France departs for Beirut ten times a week from Paris CDG.


Oman Muscat


The mix of traditional Arab architecture and new developments give the Omani capital an ambience all its own. There were disturbances in the early days of the Arab Spring but Sultan Qaboos acted swiftly to meet demonstrators’ demands. High oil prices have ensured the economy is strong and continues to grow. But although oil and gas are the backbone of the economy, the policy is to


diversify into port development, IT start-ups and an expanded tourism industry. From Heathrow, Oman Air offers the only


direct service to Muscat, flying daily non-stop, with BA offering the same frequency via Abu Dhabi and Gulf Air transiting through Bahrain. Lufthansa departs Frankfurt once a day, and KLM flies five times a week from Schiphol.


Qatar Doha


With one of the highest rates of GDP per capita in the world, the Qatari capital has been able to invest big time in universities and medical facilities as part of the plan to rely less on the oil and natural gas industries. It has also added a raft of hotels to boost non-mass tourism, while the chemicals, steel, cement, fertilisers and banking industries are all on the rise. Qatar Airways serves Doha 35 times a week


from Heathrow and has ten weekly flights from Manchester. British Airways flies daily from Heathrow, the same frequency as Lufthansa from Frankfurt, while KLM provides five weekly departures out of Schiphol.


Saudi Arabia Riyadh


The capital of the UK’s largest trading partner in the Middle East is both Saudi Arabia’s political centre and commercial hub. It is the


80 THE BUSINESS TRAVEL MAGAZINE


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