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THE BUSINESS TRAVEL MAGAZINE I 39


 InterConti doubles up THE REVIEW ›› THE ROOM REPORT


A BRAND new InterContinental hotel opens its doors in the heart of London this November, joining the group's 37-year-old Park Lane property in the capital. The 256-room InterContinental


London Westminster, opposite St James's Park tube station, comprises a handful of Queen Anne's chambers, six storeys high and in the shape of a figure of eight, making for some interesting public and private spaces internally. "It's a real arrival for the brand," says Ed Purnell, area director of marketing London. The style is light, airy, modern


and awash in neutral colours. Throughout hotel artwork picks up on Westminster satire and wit. Bedrooms are residential in feel


with an up-to-date Media Hub of html cables, USP stick and US/ European direct plug-in sockets. With a wink to Scotland Yard close by, bedrooms are fitted with a thumb-print motif carpet. All have Nespresso machines, walk-in showers, glass desks and


RADISSON'S £10M UPGRADE


HEATHROW'S Radisson Blu Edwardian hotel has unveiled a £10million refurbishment of guestrooms, restaurants and bars and announced a further multimillion pound project to upgrade the property's 43 meeting and conference rooms. Over £25,000 was spent on each of the hotel's 350 Business Class and Deluxe bedrooms, with improvements including new beds, triple glazed windows and docking stations for Apple devices. The new-look Oceanic restaurant – the name given to the airport's terminal 3 when it first opened to serve long-haul transatlantic flights – is inspired by 1920s 'Miami meets New York' style and specialises in steak and seafood. The Bijou Bar has a touch of West End glamour about it, and serves a long list of cocktails and Champagnes.


heated bathroom mirrors. Entry level bedrooms are 26m2


and


cost £250 including VAT. There is one restaurant, the Blue Boar Smoke House with two private dining rooms, and associated expansive, 95-seat clubby-feel bar. On the first floor is a key-


accessed Club Floor that offers breakfast, lunch and, from 5pm, Champagne and canapes, shower facilities for Red Eye


guests and a free-to-use-for- one-hour boardroom for 12. Club Floor rooms carry a premium or guests can book into a classic and pay £95 per day to access the Club Lounge. On the lower ground floor are


four meeting rooms ranging in size from those accommodating ten up to the largest with a capacity of 300 for a reception and 120 theatre-style.


SOUTH PLACE MOVES INTO THE CITY


IN BRIEF


• THE latest addition to the Mövenpick Hotels & Resorts portfolio is the 176-room Mövenpick Hotel in Ankara. It is located in the Turkish capital city’s fast-developing Sogutozu business district, amid offi ces for the likes of EON, BP, Oracle, Turkish government ministries and media companies. The striking hotel features nine meeting spaces and a 12-storey central atrium and glass ceiling. Executive rooms on the 11th and 12th fl oors grant guests access to an executive lounge, terrace and meeting room with complimentary drinks and snacks. There’s also a wellness and fi tness centre and fl agship restaurant, Plus, for breakfast, lunch and dinner.


• SERVICED apartment operator SACO has marked 15 years of business with the opening of a new location in London. The opening of SACO Aldgate Foundry Court, located just off Whitechapel Road, increases the company’s operated locations to 15 across the capital. The property is comprised of one, two and three-bedroom units designed by Luke Doonan of Conscious Image, each with open plan kitchen and balcony. Jo Redman, director, SACO, says, “Over the past 12 months the demand for serviced apartment accommodation near the City has constantly outstripped supply.” The company now operates 650 apartment across 32 key business destinations in the UK.


THE South Place Hotel has opened in the City of London with a focus on fine dining and striking design. Operators D&D claim it is the


first independent luxury hotel in the City, where it is located between Moorgate and Liverpool Street, and says it aims to be ‘more meet and eat than sleep’. British diner 3 South Place is


open throughout the day on the ground floor, plus there’s a late night bar, the seventh-floor Angler seafood restaurant, ‘secret garden’


atrium bar, Le Chiffre lounge and five private meeting rooms. The 80 rooms and suites are individually designed and feature artwork from Hoxton Art Gallery and the Jealous Gallery, a welcome box by Studio Conran and 40-inch Bang & Olufsen televisions. South Place is a member of Design Hotels and rooms start from £300 per night. Non- refundable weekend rates are available for £176 per night for a limited time.


• HYATT Hotels has opened its fi rst Andaz hotel in the Netherlands. The Andaz Amsterdam Prinsengracht is the ninth property under the Andaz brand which is already present in London, New York and Shanghai, among other cities. “We are pleased to introduce the Andaz brand to a city that is synonymous with style and character, two elements that are core to the Andaz ethos,” says Peter Norman, SVP acquisitions and development for Hyatt International, EMEA. Andaz Amsterdam Prinsengracht is centrally located in the bustling heart of the city in the Jordaan district. The hotel has 117 guestrooms but 15 different room types due to the design of the 1970s-style, former Public Library. The hotel's bar, lounge, library and Bluespoon restaurant – showcasing "inventive western seaboard cuisine and seasonal farm-to-table food" – are all located on the ground fl oor.


44 THE BUSINESS TRAVEL MAGAZINE


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