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THE KNOWLEDGE 1 corporate case study


How and why to... CAR SHARING


Switching your travellers from their own vehicles into those of a car-sharing scheme is no easy task. Read on to find out how the City of York Council managed it and reaped both cost and environmental benefits in doing so


tackle. And not for them the switch to pool cars instead, but something more innovative – an hourly rental car sharing service. “It’s a change management process and it


G


takes some brave steps by the employer to force a change in employee behaviour at a time when the public sector is going through such a tough time,” comments Rob Ingram, director of business rental at Enterprise-Rent- A-Car and provider of the scheme, WeCar. “You’ve got to stand up and say, ‘I know you’re not used to doing this but the new scheme will help benefit the company,” he adds. WeCar was launched


Geoff Derham Head of Waste & Fleet Services,


City of York Council


Geoff has worked in local authorities for 33 years. He has worked in and


managed a range of services including grounds


maintenance, street cleansing, refuse and recycling, school and building cleaning and fl eet management and maintenance. He has also managed large corporate


projects and has been undertaking a


review into transport and fl eet operations across the Council since January 2011.


in the UK in 2009, more on an environmental platform rather than a cost saving one. Car sharing is patronised well in Holland and France, but it’s yet to have any real impact in the UK. One of the first


innovative businesses to take up the scheme in the UK was Woking Borough Council, who replaced ten pool cars with two WeCars. It has recently added one electric car and built a charging station. The City of York Council also decided to plough ahead with car sharing, ready to face the consequences. What were they? Read on to find out.


“It’s a change management process and it takes some brave steps by the employer to force a change in employee behaviour at a time when the public sector is going through such a tough time”


STEP 1


What triggered the new thinking was a planned office move to a new headquarters in York in spring 2013. Some 1,000 staff would be amalgamated into one building, totalling 3,500 employees, and with only three car parking spaces on-site. The Council had already attempted to rein in


costs by reducing the price they reimbursed on business mileage, from 52p to 45p, but as the Council’s head of waste and fleet services, Geoff Derham explains, there were other issues that needed tackling. “There were no checks on whether they were legitimate business journeys as there was no pre-authorisation and no accountability.


Employees looked on it as a perk,” says Derham. “Also, the average age of our grey fleet was six to seven years and so we were pumping out a lot of CO2


into York and


polluting the local environment.” Enterprise-Rent-A-Car was already on the


government procurement framework for transport – as a car hire provider – and suggested the WeCar car-sharing scheme. “That helped us avoid a lengthy and expensive procurement process,” adds Derham.


STEP 2


Derham decided to trial five WeCars in one department, its main 170-strong Eco Depot site at Hazel Court in York where there are 170


etting employees out of their own car for business purposes is a tough call but one that City Of York Council was prepared to


IMPLEMENT


6 THE BUSINESS TRAVEL MAGAZINE


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