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CO-OP PAGE 2  OCTOBER 2012 CO-OP


Inside Your Co-op is published monthly for members of Choctaw Electric Cooperative.


Board of Trustees PRESIDENT


MIKE BAILEY • BROKEN BOW VICE PRESIDENT


BOB HODGE • BETHEL SECRETARY TREASURER


RODNEY LOVITT • NASHOBA BILL MCCAIN • IDABEL


BUDDY ANDERSON • VALLIANT HENRY BAZE • RATTAN


JOE BRISCO • FT. TOWSON BOB HOLLEY • ANTLERS


LARRY JOHNSON • FROGVILLE


Management and Staff CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Terry Matlock


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Susan G.Wall


DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS Jia Johnson


BENEFITS SPECIALIST Tonia Allred


DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & ACCOUNTING Jimmie K. Ainsworth


DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Jim Malone


DISTRICT SUPERVISOR Darrell Ward


toll free telephone 800-780-6486


web site www.choctawelectric.coop


TO REPORT A POWER OUTAGE PLEASE CALL


800-780-6486 24 hours a day • seven days a week


Can you find the lucky light bulb? Find it at www.choctawelectric.coop, and you could win $25!


Choctaw Electric’s lucky light bulb is hidden on the Choctaw Electric Cooperative website. Find it and you could win $25! Search for the icon at www.choctawelectric.coop. If you spot the lucky lightbulb, please email LoisAnn Beason at lbeason@choctawelectric.coop.


It has been said that running a company is like conducting a symphony orchestra. I think it is more like a jazz ensemble with a lot of improvisation.


In my role as manager of your co-op, I have learned that in order to inspire workers to achieve a higher level of teamwork, well, there are some things you must do that don’t come naturally. These are the skills that can only be acquired through continual work and study.


Leadership arouses passion—in ourselves and in others. With that passion we should be able to influence our communities or employees to face certain problems, take action and get through the situation. We expect them to accomplish certain things; these expectations should, however, be realistic.


The way that we lead or motivate our employees to meet our expectations become the goals that our employees set for themselves. This becomes their personality and the way that we perceive them.


Culture also plays a huge role in the leadership process. The culture of a


BY TERRY MATLOCK Chief Executive Officer


The way we do things Choctaw Electric strives for a culture of success W


hile I was working to complete my Master of Business Administration degree, I took some courses


on leadership. With that in mind, I would like to put into perspective the roles that we, as co-op employees, play in the efficient delivery of electricity to our members.


workplace or any community of people is a combination of founding principles, past and current leadership, plus our shared experiences, crises, rites and rituals. In essence, it is “the way we do things.”


Organizations, communities and businesses, even families, form a climate or attitude around “the way we do things” and before long these formal and informal systems or traditions become the ‘feel of the organization.’


So the culture of a community, organization or workplace is directly related to its leadership or management style, its values, attributes, skills, and actions.


Choctaw Electric Cooperative is no different. We also set goals for ourselves and these goals are within reason: To accomplish those things that you, as members, feel are important. We strive to do so in a way that make you proud of your co-op and our accomplishments.


I speak for all Choctaw Electric employees when I say, we hope you share the sense that we are doing things right. We hope that we share your expectations, and that we can create or continue the vision of our Choctaw Electric Cooperative founders. At Choctaw Electric, we want to nurture a positive climate and culture of success that is ‘our way of doing things.’


CEC


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