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C A N A D I A N October 2012


V A L


ELECTRALITE Retirees dedicate years of service to CVEC


SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative retiree Larry Seaton is already having trouble filling his spare time after a 36- year career with the cooperative. Larry retired in August, and although he’s had plenty of projects to keep him busy around the house, he’s returned to fill-in a couple of days at his old job. Larry re- tired as a service man, which required he be on call 24-hours a day, 7 days a week. “Retirement is different than I thought it would be,” Larry said. “I get up about the same time every morning thinking about going to work.” Larry, 65, and his wife Redonna, make their home in Paden. They have three children: Kelly Jo (40), Justin (39), and Krendy (35). The couple has been blessed with nine grandchildren. Grandchildren Maggie (4), and Willow (18 months), from Arkansas, visited their grandparents in August. Larry said he hopes to have more time now that he is retired, to spend with his grandchildren. On August 10, 2012 at 4:30 p.m., Larry took his last job order as a Cana- dian Valley Area Representative, said Cordis Slaughter, CVEC engineer and Larry’s supervisor. Larry’s jobs during his career have been Apprentice Line- man, Journeyman Lineman to his pres- ent job as Area Representative. Prior to coming to Canadian Valley, Larry worked for Prague Roofing until he went to the U.S. Army for about 3


L


E Y The power of human connections By George


MANAGER’S REPORT 2012 Annual Meeting of Members This is the seventy-third annual meeting of the member/owners of Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. I am fairly certain that 72 years ago at the first Annual Meeting of Canadian Valley Electric members there was not a large crowd present as there is today. In all likelihood there were probably about a dozen people present and that would have included the original incorporators and I am sure their attorney. Roger and I weren’t there. Of those present at that first Canadian Valley Electric Annual Meeting none of the members had CVEC electricity in their homes. Yet they came. I am sure that they believed that they would get electricity in their homes. Maybe they just thought that this new electric cooperative was their best bet at getting electricity. That at least had to be their story as they had collected a $5.00 promise from many of their neighbors to get the cooperative started. At this point that was their story and they were sticking to it. And they stuck to their story and belief until it happened.


Retiree Larry Seaton (front) speaks at his re- tirement party. Seaton retired from CVEC after 36 years. With him is CVEC engineer Cordis Slaughter.


years and upon his return he went back to Prague Roofing until his employment with Cana- dian Valley Electric Cooperative.


“In a major outage event, hours can quickly turn into days and days into weeks. Larry never backed up. He was like the energizer bunny; he just kept going and going. When a consumer needed something that was really outside of the Coop’s responsibility, Larry took personal responsibility and could usually figure out a way to safely engineer at least a tempo- rary fix until more permanent repairs could be made,” Cordis said. David Heaton retired on May 31 after 34 years. David’s jobs during those years have been Basket Operator, Construction Foreman, Crew Chief, Lead Lineman, Warehouse Super- visor to his most recent job as Right-of-Way Coordinator. Prior to coming to Canadian Val- ley, David was an Equipment Operator for 2 businesses in Texas, a Repairman for a business in Texas and a Lineman for an electric utility in Texas. “David has been counting down the days the last few years. Between handling right of way issues, helping stake larger jobs and rounding up and deploying right of way crews dur- ing large storms, I know David is looking forward to a simpler life,” Slaughter said. “David has dealt with countless right of way complaints (some at gunpoint) while trying to maintain a positive and helpful attitude.”


Suzanne Harris retired June 1 after over 21 years at CVEC. Suzanne’s jobs during those years have been Dispatcher, Payment Arrangement Clerk and Customer Service Representa- tive. Prior to coming to Canadian Valley, Suzanne was a bookkeeper at a bank, “Suzanne has been a very dedicated employee to her job and Canadian Valley,” said her


supervisor, Nancy Lucy. “She will be missed but we wish Suzanne the very best in her days of leisure. When it storms, I hope she remembers us, but we are sure that she would say I’m glad it’s them and not me.”


But they did believe and they did stick to that belief through the war years when few lines were built and energized. In fact it was well into the 1950’s before the majority of the service area was afforded central sta- tion electricity. I grew up North of Prague. We did not get electricity to our home until 1953. I was only three years old at the time so I am a little hazy on the difference having electricity made. My mother is a little clear- er. When she married my Dad, she moved from a home that had electricity to a house that did not. And that was the way it was for the first four years of her married life until Canadian Valley Electric brought those old creosote poles to our home to bring electric- ity. She still lives at the same account today. (Same House, Same Home) Today almost 73 years since those first


believers met and said that we are going to have electricity in our homes outside the city limits; Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. is a successful cooperative electric util- ity serving people and businesses from the eastern city limits of Oklahoma City to the western shores of Lake Eufaula. This year


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