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Page 2 C A N A D I A N V A L L E Y


P.O. Box 751 Seminole, Okla. 74818 Serving Hughes, Lincoln, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Pottawatomie, Seminole and portions of Oklahoma, Cleveland and Creek counties


ELECTRALITE By George cont.


Main Office and Headquarters Interstate 40 at the Prague/Seminole Exit


Area Office


35 W JC Watts Street, Eufaula Office Hours


8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday -Friday Board of Trustees


President— Yates Adcock, Dustin.............................District 8 Vice President — Joe Semtner, Konawa ..................District 6 Secretary-Tres.—Robert Schoenecke, Meeker .........District 2 Asst. Sec/Treas. — Steve Marak, Konawa ...............District 1 ...........................................District 4


Clayton Eads, Shawnee


Gary Crain, Prague.....................................................District 3 Matt Goodson, Tecumseh...........................................District 5 J.P. Duvall, Seminole .................................................District 7 George E Hand .....................................................Manager J. Roger Henson ....................................................Attorney Ann Weaver ...........................................................Editor


Telephone Numbers


Seminole .........................................................(405) 382-3680 Shawnee, Tecumseh, Earlsboro ......................(405) 273-4680 Toll free.............................................................(877)382-3680 Eufaula ........................................................... (918) 689-3232


Read


Cycle 1 Cycle 2 Cycle 3


26th-31st 6th-11th 16th-21st


In Case of Trouble


1. Check for blown fuse or tripped circuit breakers. 2. Check with your neighbors. Ask if their electricity is off and if they have reported it.


3. If not call the office and report the trouble.


Operating Statistics for July 2011


Operating Revenues .......................... Wholesale Cost of Power .................. Percentage WPC is of Revenue .................. Revenue Per Mi of Line: MTD ............. $1,206.92 Consumers per mile of line:MTD .................. 4.57 KWPeak Demand -This Month ................ 159,826 Billing KW Demand ..................................110,748 KW Peak Demand: YTD .......................... 162,960 KWH Purchased - This Month ............. 82,624,690 Taxes Paid ............................................... $123,779 Interest on Long Term Debt ................... $190,732 System Load Factor ......................................


$6,234,953 $4,436,671 71.16


69.5 2012


$5,931,712 $4,132,615 69.67


$1,145.12 4.60


157,582 115,112 160,468


79,308,690 110,563 187,134 67.6


New Services Staked in August


During the month of August 104 new services were staked. The total new services staked in 2012 is 820. This compares to 610 for the same period in 2011.


Billing date 5th


15th 25th


1-1/2% penalty is applied 20


after billing date


Canadian Valley Electric reached the point of having more than one hundred million dollars invested in poles, wire, transform- ers, meters and the associated facilities necessary to provide retail electric service to 24,000 retail customers using more than 160,000 kilowatts of electric power. And when I say Canadian Valley that means you. Canadian Valley Electric is one of the largest electric cooperatives in Oklahoma and over the past few years has been one of the fastest growing. Today with the oil “boom” in Northern and Western Oklahoma, the “hot spot” for growth in Oklahoma has moved north. But we are still doing OK.


I guess the best thing I can say about the last two years is at least we did not have an ice storm. However the record heat and drought of the last two years have brought its own set of challenges to the Cooperative and its members. With record heat Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative customers used record amounts of electricity. When the summer temperature hit 110 degrees plus I be- lieve virtually every air-conditioner connected to the CVEC electric system must have been running at the same time. As one customer told me, “What do you think I bought the (blank) thing for?” I did not have a come-back. The Canadian Valley Electric distribution system held up well to these new higher usage levels. However those hot days did cause the cooperative to require overall higher peak demand levels for electric power which will have to be paid for over the coming years.


10 degrees plus I be Growth and hot temperature have claimed more of the


available generating capacity in this region and moved closer to the time when new generating plants will have to be built to meet this growing appetite for electricity. Today the total consumption of electricity nationwide is somewhat depressed due to the slow econo- my. When the economy “picks” up we will expect more demand for electricity. This is true throughout most of the nation. Being in the business, I like to see new electric generating plants built. I have often said that you can’t have too much electric generating capacity, - unless you are the one who owns it. A much worse position is not having enough capacity to meet the demand.


But growing demand for electricity and the cost of additional generating capacity are not the only concerns. When I first gradu- ated more than 40 years ago we were in an energy crisis. There were lines at gasoline stations and most were not open on Sundays. The government regulators said we were running out of natural gas and passed laws forbidding the construction of new natural gas fired electric generators. They went further saying that existing natural gas generating plants would have to be shut down by 1990. The an- swer was build new coal fired generating plants and nuclear plants. Most of the nuclear plants that were planned and started failed over safety concerns and extreme cost overruns. New coal fired genera- tors were the only option and they were not cheap costing as much as five times as much to build as the natural gas electric generating plants they were replacing. Several new coal fired generating plants were built in Oklahoma as was the case throughout much of the nation. By the early 1980’s electric rates were rising rapidly to pay for this new coal fired generating capacity. At the state level elected regulators were defeated as the consumer rebelled in the only way they knew how even thought the state regulators had no control over the result of this government required change from natural gas to coal. Across the country members removed cooperative board members in anger at their higher electric bills.


Today after we as consumers have paid for a large portion of the cost of these coal fired generating plants, the government regulators are saying these coal plants are too “dirty.” They want these coal


The ElectraLite


October 2012


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