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CREATIVE THOUGHT In the passing lane T


his summer Ann Hammel Kahl ’51 started storing away some of the 500 trophies and


medals that were overrunning her Florida home. While she was at it, she retired a T-shirt her son had given her when she turned 80 in favor of an updated version that reads “You have just been passed by an 83-year-old.” She passes lots of people, in 5K, 10K, and


half-marathon races, and consistently wins in her age category. The trim and healthy Kahl, a vegetarian who takes no medications, also trains a dozen men and women in their 50s and 60s. “I just want to get people excited about staying well,” she says. She stays well with her own daily workouts, varying her rou- tine—“At my age you don’t pound one ac tivity constantly, you cross-train”— to combine run- ning, spinning, and weight training.


When it came


to weeding out her trophies, Kahl’s choices were more


about aesthetics


than athletics. “I keep the ones that are beautiful to look at,” says the Skidmore art major whose career in commercial art gave her “many oppor- tunities to be creative, to design, to illustrate.” Her most recent creative opportunity, as a


calligrapher, has really taken off, with clients all over the United States and Europe who treasure her beautifully inscribed wedding invitations. They tell her that when people open the invita- tions they are speechless. That, says Kahl, “is my real payment.” Robust good health is payment for all those miles she has run. For those she leaves in the dust—and particularly those cheering her on from the sidelines—Kahl has a simple message: “You can do this too. Just keep with the regime, because once you stop, it’s hard to get back into it again.” Clearly, there is no stopping her. —KG


her vision loss has increased, she can no longer play the piano by reading music. She says, “Music majors, I salute you. I didn’t know how difficult chord structure, intervals, and modes are. But it’s never too late to learn!” She is also experiment- ing with knitting sculptural forms with wire, and so enjoyed her conversations with Arline Fisch, who has written sever- al books on it. Nancy Colway Cammann and her hus-


band “raised a little Cain” while celebrat- ing their granddaughter’s graduation in NYC and also visited with Sance Buhai Barz on the same weekend as our 60th reunion. Sance Barz continues with her Inuit art research but no longer travels great dis- tances professionally. She visited with Barbara Ann Bower in Colorado and then again in NYC when Barb had a fam - ily wedding. Sance occasionally takes her nieces on trips, including a recent one to Cuba. From April to October she is in Amagansett and would love to see any classmates who may be in NYC or Eastern Long Island.


Nancy Strouce Ferris and Joan Marshall Berger returned to Skidmore for their first reunion, our 60th! They report, “It was so much fun, and we so enjoyed seeing old friends again.” Orlyn Barron Harrison also returned for her first reunion. She says, “I am sorry it has taken me 60 years to do it. What a fan- tastic time renewing friendships, making new ones, and seeing the beautiful new campus.” After Skidmore, Lynne earned her master’s degree in library science at SUNY-Albany, worked for 10 years at RPI, and then became associate library director at the Technological University in Orlando (later the University of Central Florida). She had a wonderful time helping to com- puterize the card catalog. Lynn retired in 1996 and lives in Winter Springs, FL. Dora Holter-Sorenson Berggrav remi- nisces from her home in Oslo, Norway, about her Skidmore days—the ski and ten- nis teams, roommate Ann Brown Ab dalla, Cindy Hartwig Gyorgy (who has visited her in Norway), all the PE students and faculty, and the many, many chocolate bars she ate. Dora says, “My health is not what it used to be, but I am lucky to have three nice sons with families (six grand- daughters) all living in the neighborhood.” Ann Brown Abdalla was hoping to at - tend Reunion, but health issues interfered. Doctor appointments have kept her busy. Doris Schueller Baum was so looking


forward to Reunion, but the need for foot surgery changed her plans.


42 SCOPE FALL 2012


Marion Bolton Northrup had a two-


week trip to Chile with 11 nights on Easter Island, where she enjoyed the an - nual Tapati festival, which encompasses history, crafts, sports, and performing arts. Marion says, “The competitions and stage shows greatly enhanced our visits to the many archeological sites of the moai (large stone statues) and other ‘ruins.’” Betty Tullis Hagen and Art took four


US trips last year—to Hancock, MA; New Bern, NC; Las Vegas; and Florida. She adds, “We took a repositioning cruise from Barcelona, Spain, to Ft. Lauderdale over Thanksgiving, to top off the year.” Eva Brunner Cohn and husband Don celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. Maryette Leiberteers was sorry to miss Reunion. She says, “I was up to my ears in my grandson’s soccer games, guild activities, tai chi, and water aerobics.” Mollylou Bendure Hunter says, “Skid - more changed my life. Dr. Bullon’s course on the Bible was excellent, and the course on Shakespeare opened my eyes to his plays. My art history course has taken me to galleries in many countries! And I met my husband, Millard (Union ’50), there.” Ann Ridge Adams loves living in Seat -


tle, WA, with husband Mac and a large family close by. Their four children and six grandchildren ski and sail together, and all enjoy celebrating the holidays and birthdays. BETTY JOHNSON BOOTHE 14 HEEGEONG DRIVE DENNIS, MA 02638-2220 508-385-5735 BETTYBOOTHE@GMAIL.COM


’53


Robbie Smith Exner says she


had no skiing last win- ter: “A hip replacement was scheduled to be done in time for ski sea- son, but my beach


N MAY 30–JUNE 2


house in New Jersey burned down. I got out but inhaled so much smoke that my lungs won’t permit anesthesia for a lengthy operation.” While housebound, she drew up plans for a new place, which she was hoping would be finished for the summer.


In February Jacqueline Bailey Martin


had a fun lunch on Cape Cod with Ann Shaaber Campney, Joan Dymond Bar - nett, and Cynthia Madsen Henson. Sadly, Cyndie passed away in May. Carol Bradford Kirby plans to move to Durham, NC, where her children (Duke alums) will retire soon. Gail McKay has a new address, at son


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AT WORK


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