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Stonewalling


Another campus repair project has won a Saratoga Springs Preservation Foundation award. Along the Fourth Street edge of campus, a low stone wall had lain in disrepair—until its entire 545-foot length was rebuilt using the original stones, thanks to local mason Nick Vacchio in cooperation with the Skidmore grounds crew. “It’s a real art form to fit the stones together with no mortar to hold things in place,” notes Bruce Murray, grounds supervisor. Samantha Bosshart, who heads the Preservation Foundation, cited Skidmore for investing in its historic property, which helps “make Saratoga Springs a wonderful place to live, work, and visit.”


8LINE AND SHAPE


Wish you


knew more about the college admissions process?


Still—made of steel, wood, glass, and whiskey—embodies the approach of artist Terry Adkins, whose show Recital is at the Tang Museum through Decem-


ber 2. In his sculpture, photography, video, and performances, Adkins trans- forms and repurposes found materials and archival imagery in order to uphold and reexamine the life and legacy of such immortal figures as Bessie Smith, Sam Lightnin’ Hopkins, Beethoven, Matthew Henson, and John Brown. Also at the Tang, through December 30, is Dance/Draw, which explores drawing with the body, drawing with thread or wire, dance as a line drawn in space, and similar blends of line art and bodily performance. For full Tang information, visit tang.skidmore.edu or call 518-580-8080.


Skidmore invites high school juniors who are the children of Skidmore alumni or employees, and siblings of current students, to attend


JUNIOR ADMISSIONS WORKSHOP


January 27 –28 on campus


Look for more details soon at skidmore.edu/jaws or call 518-580-5610


12 SCOPE FALL 2012


HOOD MUSEUM OF ART AT DARTMOUTH COLLEGE; PURCHASED THROUGH GUERNSEY CENTER MOORE 1904 FUND; S.2003.39


BOB KIMMERLE


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