This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Front of the layout vignettes: No. 24 Ice and the railroads: Pt. III– railroad ice houses


Railroads used ice to keep meat and produce shipments cool/David Lambert R


ailroad ice houses are for the purpose of storing supplies of ice at convenient points.21 While this statement was obviously true for railroad companies with a large perishable traffic, it was even more so for packing house companies and private car lines. For example, the Armour Car Lines company was forced to build large, expensive houses in places like Georgia (peach crop) and Louisiana (strawberries) to support the perishable businesses there that they largely created. In support of these warm weather houses, refrigera-


tor cars had to be deployed to ship ice to fill them.22


It is important to understand that


railroad ice houses were rarely situat- ed near the original source of the ice. Union Pacific’s 526-foot long ice house


RAILWAY AND ENGINEERING REVIEW,VOL.42, NO. 11; MARCH 15, 1902


These early 1900’s views show the UP’s “new” icing facility at North Platte. The view of the ice house end (above) shows the ice elevator gigs, which are placed at each set of doors on each ice house. No- tice that the icing platform doesn’t abut the front of the house–the gig elevator is between the house and the platform. North Platte did


AUTHOR’S COLLECTION: NORTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA


not have its own ice source and was therefore fitted with the UP stan- dard double platform which had a lower “winter” platform about four feet above the top of the rail (below). Notice the peak of the platform roofs and the various crossbraces on the icing platform. Interesting- ly, there is no end ladder from either platform on the abovephoto.


68


JUNE 2012


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100