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PHOTOS BY MATT SNELL


Modeling municipal waste trains Part II: recycled intermodal equipment Using trash containers, tarps and flatcars/M.R. Snell


O


ver the last decade, as large ur- ban areas struggled with land- fill capacities, they looked into


moving municipal waste by train to help solve their capacity problems. Having the ability to haul large quan- tities of material efficiently, railroads have discovered that moving municipal waste is a booming business. This traf- fic can often be found in large blocks or even unit trains moving waste from a transfer station to landfills hundreds of miles from its origin point. While specially designed and shipper owned equipment has been developed to max- imize loading capacity, fleets of second- hand shipping containers and flat cars have


helped create the waste revolution of today.


Modelers of modern-era railroading are faced with the dilemma of how to add this traffic to their layouts, as, with the exception of Atlas, no model manufacturer has rail equipment for the waste industry even though it has become an integral part of present day railroading. Modeling the specially-de- signed equipment requires extensive scratchbuilding.


However, modeling


secondhand containers and flatcars RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN


converted for municipal waste use can be accomplished by kitbashing many of the high quality, ready-to-run models now available.


Converted trash containers The simplest of the intermodal waste equipment to model is the standard 20- foot sea container which has been con- verted to use in waste service. These containers are in dedicated waste serv-


ice and have been modified by removal of the roof and the addition of a tie- down rail along both the sides and front, enabling the containers to be tarped when loaded.


Modeling a tarped container is a fair- ly basic modeling project using factory decorated, 20-foot, rib-side containers available from either Walthers or At- hearn. If a permanent tarp is desired, the roof will remain covered and no


59 intermodal


On both the prototype and layout, the simplest way to provide equipment for hauling mu- nicipal waste is to cut away the tops of 20-foot containers and add tarp tie-downs.


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