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A SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


®


LIVEWIRE APRIL 2012 | VO LUME 63 ISSUE 4 | PUBLISHED FOR MEMBERS OF T RI-COUNTY EL ECT RIC COOP E RAT IV E Plan ahead for new construction By JuliAnn Graham, Communication Specialist P


lanning construction for a new home, business, irrigation service or similar structure is an exciting prospect that is also a complicated process with many considerations. Contacting Tri-County Electric Cooperative should be an early part of that process


as those structures require electricity, which takes time to plan and build. It is also quite costly and is paid for by the party requesting the new service. “Job location is a factor in the amount of time it takes us to stake the job and provide an estimate of costs to build the service,” Rick Wayman, Tri-County Electric Construction manager, said. “I recommend that members allow from one to three weeks to receive a cost estimate for their project. We receive a large volume of requests for new construction from the agriculture and oil industries we serve along with the requests for residential service. It’s a coordinated effort to balance these requests.” Wayman also noted the location and number of poles, wire, rights-of-way, transformers,


etc., required to extend the line will impact the estimate itself. “The location of the structure itself is a major factor in cost as that determines how


much line we have to build to tie in to the existing power lines,” Wayman said. “This isn’t as much of an issue in towns as it is in the country where distances to the nearest power line can be more extreme.” Tri-County Electric’s Rules and Regulations of Service govern line extensions under the


Facilities Extension rule. This rule state that a member pays 100 percent of the estimated capital investment necessary to provide the facilities extension. However, for residential services requested by a member, the cooperative will contribute up to $2,600 toward the cost of extending new service to a regular home or up to $3,700 to an all-electric home. This rule ensures the cooperative and the member contribute to the investment in building the new service. The dollar amount for the cooperative’s contribution is determined by an annual cost


of service study averaging the costs of constructing new residential service. For new service in town, the facilities extension cost may be below the cooperative’s contribution because the residence may only require a meter loop. For new service in a rural area, the estimated cost may exceed the cooperative’s contribution significantly. “We encourage members to call early in the planning process when they’re looking to


build a new home,” Zac Perkins, Tri-County Electric Corporate Services vice president, said. “The facilities extension rule is in line with industry standards. It is also in the best interest of our membership as a whole. Members share equally in maintenance costs and system improvements of the existing infrastructure but it wouldn’t be fair to ask them to bear the costs for other members’ construction projects.” Members wishing to establish new electric service should call Tri-County Electric Cooperative at 800-522-3315 and ask for an estimate.


A PAD MOUNT TRANSFORMER IS LOWERED INTO PLACE AS PART


OF A FACILITIES


EXTENSION FOR A NEW BUSINESS IN GUYMON. IT’S NOT UNCOMMON FOR NEW RESIDENCES OR BUSINESSES TO REQUIRE ADDITIONAL TRANSFORMERS OR NEW LINES.


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