This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
April 2012


SWRE... Serving Two States SWRE is somewhat unique in the cooperative


world in that our organization is almost equally divided between members in Southwest Oklahoma and North Texas.


As a result we are members of two statewide cooperative organizations – Texas Electric Cooperatives (TEC) and the Oklahoma Association of Electrical Cooperatives (OAEC). We are very fortunate that these two statewide organizations are two of the premier state cooperative groups in the nation. Under the excellent leadership of Mike Williams in Texas and Chris Meyers in Oklahoma, our cooperative benefits from the staffs and resources of both states. These resources allow SWRE to access a wealth of information from diverse sources within the framework of those organizations. For example, we are able to purchase transformers, cross-arms, braces, insulators, etc. from TEC because they have formed a separate cooperative for all TEC member co-ops to purchase distribution equipment at bulk prices. TEC also has its own pole treatment facility that allows us to purchase poles at reduced prices while also ensuring rapid delivery of new poles in a storm scenario.


At the same time, we are able to compare prices with our traditional suppliers that serve the Oklahoma area and make choices that ultimately benefit our cooperative.


In addition, we are able to seek legal and legislative advice and updates from both statewide organizations.


One of the biggest advantages of serving two states is our membership. I know that I am biased, but I believe that some of the finest people in the United States reside in Southwest Oklahoma and North Texas. These folks are hardworking, honest, and decent people. Our members are represented by directors from both Texas and Oklahoma. Having directors from both states does make it interesting during college sporting events,


by Mike R. Hagy Chief Executive Officer


although Oklahoma State and Texas Tech may have the most fans among SWRE Board members as opposed to OU and Texas! One of the things about being involved in both states that I enjoy personally is getting to know and communicate with CEO/General Managers from both Oklahoma and Texas. These men and women are a great resource and I am pleased to say that there is a genuine kinship among not only managers, but also among all cooperative employees in both states.


What is the downside to serving in two states?


We of course deal with two state legislatures, two state regulatory agencies (the Corporation Commission in Oklahoma and the Public Utility Commission in Texas), and twice the travel, meetings, and training. Yet the pros far outweigh the cons when it comes to serving in two states. In the time of uncertainties that face our industry, our cooperative is able to glean the best practices of cooperatives in both states and see how they can benefit our own cooperative. We can also learn from the mistakes of co-ops in both states and make sure we avoid those pitfalls in our cooperative. Certainly, challenges lie ahead for all electric utilities and the customers they serve. Carbon taxes, Cap and Trade, and rising generation costs may be some of the biggest challenges for cooperatives in our history, but I believe that positive results like conservation of energy and development of alternative energy sources will ultimately benefit our co-op’s members as well as our nation.


The bottom line is that serving members in two states is not really like a tale of two separate states. It is more like combining the best that two states can offer and applying those principles to serve our members through our vision of “safety, service, and satisfaction – one member at a time.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178