This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
NORTHERN EXPOSURE


across a moorland plateau and close to Loch Tollaidh, before dropping again to sea level at Poolewe itself. Poolewe is a small, but attractive village at the head of the sheltered sea loch of Loch Ewe. It used to be a bustling little port with connections to the Outer Isles. However, it is famous nowadays for being only a mile down the road from the world famous Inverewe Gardens. Founded by Osgood Mackenzie in 1862, on a barren peninsula overlooking the village of Poolewe, these are recognised as one of the finest gardens in Europe, with a plant collection of international importance. With more than 130,000 visitors each year, Inverewe has become a mecca for garden lovers who marvel at the rich diversity of plants which thrive in this remote corner of the Highlands. Favoured with the milder climate created by the Gulf Stream, Inverewe Gardens, now in the care of the National Trust for Scotland, is well named as the ‘Oasis of the North’. Loch Ewe was also one of the main convoy assembly lochs used in World War II, and a string of disused fortifications along much of the lochside testifies to the substantial activity that went on here in those days. Carrying on towards Aultbea, there are signs pointing


to the Loch Ewe Distillery – the only business of its kind in the entire area, despite its rich smuggling


MEET OUR STAFF Laura


& Phil GAIRLOCH HOSTEL


history. A couple of miles north of Aultbea, just before you reach the community of Laide, you will reach Laide Wood. Tis is used by the local community as well as visitors, who come here to enjoy the vast array of wildlife and spectacular views. Natural features, which make walking along the woodland tracks here such a pleasurable experience, include deep water courses, two lochans and a cascading waterfall which feeds Loch na Creige, the lochan by its eastern boundary.


MOVING


Laura and Phil Roxby will be joined for their third season at Gairloch Carn Dearg (open April to September) by a new assistant – baby Poppy. Laura and Phil got married on the beach outside the hostel in 2011.


on, the first item of interest after the village


of Laide is Gruinard Island, which lies in the centre of the large bay on your left. Tis gained a certain level of local infamy when experiments using Anthrax spores were carried out there prior to World War II. Gruinard Bay itself has a fantastic beach – large, gently sloping, and where the sea recedes well out into the bay at low tide. Tis is a particularly relaxing spot for a beach walk or picnic. After Gruinard Bay, the road passes close by


Gruinard House before climbing inland again. Te car park and viewpoint at the top of the hill give excellent views out over Little Loch Broom to the Scoraig Peninsula, and then further north towards Achiltibuie and the surrounding hills.


2012 SCOTTISH HOSTELLER 27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84