This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Delivered to the site in one piece, extra rooms, such as the master bedroom slide out and create more floor space, similar to fancy RVs.


 


If dust, leaves or shade reduce a single pair’s output, this arrangement ensures that the impact is localized, not system-wide.


Hot water generated by solar thermal panels can also heat the home’s interior through heat exchangers in the air ducts. But these ducts are special as well. They have a built-in feature aimed at controlling the humidity that is Florida’s biggest challenge to human comfort.


To maintain an average relative humidly of 75%, the FleX House team created “a liquid desiccant duct system” combined with an energy recovery ventilator (ERV) to dehumidify incoming air. The transparent desiccant releases its captured humidity in a glass-faced recovery waterfall that also doubles as an interior design feature. The desiccant system improves the efficiency of the HVAC system by removing moisture from the supply air—allowing the fan coil temperatures to exceed the dew point while still maintaining good indoor air quality.


In nice weather, as some of Decathlon V’s visitors can attest, walls of windows glide open, making much of FleX House into a comfortable, airy pavilion. Sliding walls also enclose the bedroom space.


 


GREEN FEATURES
> Cypress Louvers. Native Florida cypress naturally resists insects and weather. Mobile adjustable louvers shield the house from the sun.
> Micro Inverters. Each pair of the 22 PV panels uses one micro inverter to optimize total array efficiency. Thus, If one pair becomes dirty or shaded, it won’t collapse the total system output.
> Desiccant Ducts. Humidity is Florida’s major comfort enemy. A liquid desiccant system is both an art feature in the living area and an energy efficient method of dehumidifying circulating air.


47 www.greenbuildermag.com 01.2012

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76