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WaterShed’s public module includes this sleek, simple kitchen, which opens onto a deck trellised with edible plants.


 


The sense of water flow begins in the centerpiece courtyard rivulet, enticing visitors to enjoy the home. Trellises loaded with greenery, a green roof, lush gardens and burbling ponds both join and separate the living modules that distinguish private from public spaces.


WaterShed won the overall category (essentially grand prize) for Decathlon V, scoring 951 points from a possible 1,000. It also took top honors in the architecture category, and second place in market appeal. However, with its green roof, cistern and wetlands costs included, it scored 12th in the affordability category at about $336,000.


WaterShed is made up of two modules connected by a bathroom module, for a total of about 900 sq. ft. of living space.


Construction is described as “heavy-stick framing—triple 2” x 6” studs, joists and rafters spaced 4 ft. apart, with 1-1/2”-thick tongue-and-groove decking used as sheathing.” The two larger modules have French door entries into the courtyard. The private module serves as both bedroom and office, with a dedicated office nook, The bed folds closed into a daytime work table, and the living module houses kitchen and living areas. The kitchen is adjacent to the vegetable and herb garden.


WaterShed’s green roof slopes to feed runoff to the cistern and wetlands. The vegetation slows rainwater flow to the landscape, while simultaneously insulating the living space below and improving energy efficiency. Collected grey water from the shower, lavatory, clothes washer and dishwasher also feeds through wetlands optimized for filtration and cleansing.


Humidity is an issue in Maryland. A patent-pending liquid-desiccant waterfall serves as art and dehumidifier. Maryland has displayed several versions of this feature in past decathlons. A high-saline liquid solution absorbs humidity from the air; from the solar panels dries the desiccant for re-use. This year, LED lights illuminate the waterfalls.


 


GREEN FEATURES
> Green Roof. Serves both as insulation for the living space below and slows storm water runoff.
> Constructed Wetland. Cisterns store collected rainwater. Collected grey water is filtered and reused to irrigate the constructed wetland.
> PV Panels. The 9.2 kW PV system makes WaterShed a net-zero home.
> Solar Hot Water. A solar thermal water system heats water.
> Patent-Pending Dehumidifier: An LED illuminated, liquid desiccant waterfall serves as artwork and dehumidification.


27 www.greenbuildermag.com 01.2012

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