This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
MARKET STRATEGY
With an economy market in mind, affordability winner Empowerhouse was right on target for an urban family with an annual income of about $50,000. To qualify for Habitat for Humanity programs, the family must have experienced unsafe conditions or a severe rent burden in its current home, and demonstrate willingness to participate in the construction and maintenance of the house.


 


The home’s student team built SIP-like envelope sandwiches of 12” engineered wood I-joists and blown-in cellulose to create R-40 walls. The team based materials selections on “affordability, green certification, embodied energy, non-toxicity, livability, constructability and overall environmental impact. This Empowerhouse is an affordable, healthy and—above all—buildable home.”


Home lighting is either natural or extreme efficiency. Natural light from the stair loft penetrates deep into the center of the home. Low cost, high efficiency linear fluorescents and LED sources reflected off interior surfaces provide general illumination. GB


 


Shelving and storage abound throughout the house. Stairs lead to the light tower/sleeping loft. Daylighting with skylights and white walls reduce daytime lighting needs.


 
DIGITAL ASSETS
> Project Manual www.solardecathlon.gov/past/2011/pdfs/pars_manual.pdf
> Construction Drawings www.solardecathlon.gov/past/2011/pdfs/pars_cd.pdf
> Menu and Recipes www.solardecathlon.gov/past/2011/pdfs/pars_menu.pdf


Video Links
> Video Walkthrough www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8UFoJAbnoVA
> Architecture Presentation www.solardecathlon.gov/videos_team_architecture.html#pars
> Engineering Presentation www.solardecathlon.gov/videos_team_engineering.html#pars
> Sales Presentation www.solardecathlon.gov/videos_team_sales.html#pars


FOR CLICKABLE URL LINKS, GO TO WWW.GREENBUILDERMAG.COM/DECATHLON


40 01.2012 www.greenbuildermag.com

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