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ElectricFlight


by don belfort You can reach Don Belfortat 8250 Twin Cove Court, West Chester, Ohio, 45069


PHOTOGRAPHY: DON BELFORT


The completed Tripacer is expected to come out in the 12–14 pound range. Wing struts made from spruce are functional with aluminum attachment points


H


i Fliers: a while back, while watching my son’s indoor soccer game, a ball sailed into the stands smacking a player’s mom


in the head resulting in a neck injury. The injury could have been prevented if the mom was focused on the game rather than reading a book. When taking fellow fliers or anyone to their first indoor flying expe- rience be sure to remind them to be aware of the action. While most indoor craft weigh less than a soccer ball, a sudden sur- prise to a spectator, like a model flying into them, could cause a loss of balance and possible injury.


slotted and epoxied in place. At this phase of construction, a more in-depth look at the power system will be the next step.


Project updates Some more news about my ¼ scale Piper Tripacer from Calvin’s Classic Plan Service www.calvinsclassicplans.com. The Tripacer fuse is slightly more complex than your average rectangular layout. The plan in- cluded building notes to aid in clarifying the strategy needed. Two side frames are built over the plans leaving out the cabin up- rights which angle outward as a diamond and are built from spruce separately. The uprights are then glued in place on each side frame, left and right respectively. The sides are now joined with cross-members as usu- al. The technique combines the half shell


method with standard rectangular con- struction. The beauty of the model’s fuse be- gins to show as 1⁄8-inch balsa is water soaked and formed from the nose to under the wing’s center section trailing edge. The balsa wood I used from National Bal-


sa www.nationalbalsa.com was very uni- form in quality, which made matching and forming a breeze! The firewall is extended with six pieces of carbon fiber rod (plans show a wood dowel) to a second firewall that acts as a nose wheel and engine mount and is epoxied in place. Using the right glue for an application is vital to your success. Bob Smith Industries


The wing construction of Don’s Tripacer (above left) is straightforward. The Hitec HS5245MG programmable servos allow a common servo mount to be used throughout the flap and aileron installation. Sullivan Products assure slop


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free linkages. The Robart Manufacturing shock adsorbing steerable nose gear and wheels (above right) protect your airframe and give a great scale look. Robart offers custom services for landing gear needs.


APRIL 2012


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