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ABOVE: A line drawing of B&O’s Atlantic, re- built on an extended frame from an original grasshopper. AUTHOR’S COLLECTION


often changed that considerable confu- sion has resulted about their identity. The Arabian No. 1 is a case in point. When it was made ready for the Chica- go Railway Appliance Exposition 1883 lettering was added to the side of the cab identifying it as the original engine of this name. However, that machine had been scrapped many years earlier and the make-believe No. 1 cannot be specifically identified. It is almost cer- tainly one of the shop switchers. After the Chicago exhibit closed, the Arabian was taken to Pittsburgh for exhibit; the exhibit building was de- stroyed October 3, 1883, at 2:00 a.m. but the iron parts of the engine were re- covered and removed to Baltimore for reconstruction. Is it now one of the three preserved grasshoppers. The Atlantic, now at the B&O Muse-


um in Baltimore, has had its jack shaft removed and is geared directly to one of the axles. The outside cranks and con- necting rods were removed as well. The frame was greatly extended. The Hancock No. 8 stands very much


TOP: Shown here is the bogus photograph of the Arabian taken behind the Mount Clare round- house in 1883. William Galloway stands in the cab. The veteran engineer died April 7, 1890. His grandson, Charles W. Galloway, was V.P. of Operations for the B&O. ABOVE: B&O engine Number 6 on display at the Maryland pavillion at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadel- phia. Note the fire door peeping out from the water tank on the left side. AUTHOR’S COLLECTION


Name


Columbus Baltimore New York Delaware Baltimore


Name uncertain Name uncertain


OTHER GRA S SHOPPERS Railroad


Leipzig & Dresden R.R. Paterson & Hudson River Paterson & Hudson River Philadelphia & Reading Allegheny Portage


Baltimore & Port Depoint Baltimore & Port Depoint


Built 1837


as rebuilt for shop switcher service. A new steel boiler replaced the old wrought iron one in 1927. The John Q. Adams No. 6 was altered in 1892 to represent the Traveller. It was recon- structed again in about 1949 to its shop switcher appearance and is now on dis- play in Deed’s Museum in Carillon Park, in Dayton, Ohio. The final grasshopper was the Mar-


Remarks


1836 In service until 1846c. 1836 In service until 1846c. 1837 1837


1836 Sold to Western R.R. MA? 1836 Sold to Western R.R. MA?


tin Van Buren No. 11 that was remod- eled in 1892 to represent the Mazeppa, a four-wheel crab with horizontal cylin- ders. It was scrapped in 1953 because it was too deteriorated to salvage. For a locomotive that first made its appearance over 175 years ago, a sur- prising number of these pioneers have survived. From workhorse locomotive to shop switcher to displays at fairs and museums, the grasshoppers have done it all. Confusing histories? Yes. But sig- nificant histories? Definitely. These are the locomotives that took the railroads out of infancy.


47


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