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for the grant have not been committed. Consequently, the Barbers Quarry branch is composed of land being steadily reclaimed by vegetation as this is being written.


Motive Power


Motive power for R.J. Corman’s Al- lentown operations, like the amount of carloadings, has been virtually un- changed over the years. At start up, a single locomotive (GP16 No. 1713) was used. This locomotive traces its lineage beginning with the Clinchfield Rail- road and later passed through the Seaboard System and then to CSX. In 1999 the 1713 was converted so that it could be operated by remote control. The 1713 was joined by another GP16 in 2002, No. 1831. The newcomer start- ed life on the Atlantic Coast Line and


then followed the merger path through the Seaboard Coast Line, Seaboard System and then CSX before it was sold to Corman.


Operations As with any shortline, service is pro-


vided on an as-needed basis. Typically, operations take place four to five days per week with weekdays being the rule. Interchange with Norfolk Southern is


scheduled two days per week. On oper- ating days, the engineer opens the gate at the Corman facility, which is sepa- rated from the surrounding neighbor- hood by a secure chain link fence. The Corman railroad operations share the site with Corman’s materials servicing business. The engineer fires up the locomotives


and guides them out of the prefabricat- ed engine shed which protects the loco-


RIGHT: The “LSS” on the light tower speaks of the former ownership of this site by Lehigh Structural Steel, a major fabrication plant that shut down in 1989. No. 1713 is switching a car of chlorine within the former LSS com- plex on May 28, 1997. BELOW: The 1831 and 1713 are operating in a push-pull mode. They are separated by a single spacer car on April 23, 2010, backing under the Tilghman Street Bridge on the Lehighton Industrial Track.


34 JULY 2011 • RAILFAN.COM


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