This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Engine No. No. 1 No. 1 No. 2 No. 2 No. 3 No. 4 No. 5 No. 6 No. 7 No. 8 No. 9


No. 10 No. 11 No. 12 No. 13


NOTES: 1. No. 1 by 1835.


2. Remodeled 1892/93 to represent “Traveller.” Restored to Shop Switcher 1847c.


3. No. 2 in 1884. Remodeled 1892/93 to represent the “Atlantic.”


BALTIMORE & OHIO RAILROAD GRASSHOPPERS Name


Atlantic Arabian1 Traveller


George Washington Thomas Jefferson James Madison James Monroe John Q. Adams2 Andrew Jackson3 John Hancock4 Phineas Davis George Clinton


Martin Van Buren5 Benjamin Franklin William Patterson


Built 1832 1834 1833 1834 1834 1835 1835 1835 1836 1836 1836 1836 1836 1837 1837


Remarks


Scrapped by 1835 Scrapped by 1863 Scrapped by 1835 Scrapped by 1835 Scrapped by 1884 Scrapped by 1884 Scrapped by 1884


On display at Reed’s Museum On display at B&O Museum On display at B&O Museum Scrapped by 1884 Scrapped by 1884 Scrapped by 1884 Scrapped by 1884 Scrapped by 1884


4. No. 8 then No. 3 in 1884. Remodeled 1892/93 to represent “Mazappa.”


5. Briefly renamed Thomas Jefferson.


ABOVE: An engraving of an early B&O grasshopper built by Gillingham & Winans. AUTHOR’S COLLECTION


the counter shaft, hence the engine was geared up not down. An eccentric drove a scotch yoke to move the valves. The boiler was 46 inches in diameter. It had 400 tubes that were 1¼ inches at the bottom and one inch at the top and were 81 inches long. The heating sur- face was three times greater than that of a Stephenson style horizontal boiler. Anthracite coal was burned which pro- duced little smoke. The coal was im- ported from Philadelphia and came in coastal sailing vessels. The cylinders


ABOVE: This engraving from the June 1890 issue of Locomotive Engineering shows engine Number 8, the John Hancock. It is currently on dis- play at the B&O Museum in Baltimore. AUTHOR’S COLLECTION


45


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