This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
were 12 by 22 inches, and the wheels were 35 inches in diameter. The engine with fuel and water weighed 7½ tons. These engines ran up to 25,000 miles a year with an average repair cost of 6.93 cents per mile.


The two grasshoppers on the Pater- son & Hudson River Railroad pulled trains of 66 tons at an average speed of 13.8 mph. The engine weight was fig- ured at 8.7 tons while the four wheel tender weighed 5½ tons. They were considered efficient and economical with repair cost of 50 cents a day. They burned 3000 pounds of an- thracite coal per trip at a cost of $7.00 per ton. The manufacturer, Gillingham & Winans, claimed a typical grasshop- per could move 211 tons on a level track at ten m.p.h. It could pull 17½ tons up a 200 foot to mile grade at six m.p.h. One of the engineers, George Hollingsworth, did not like the grasshoppers at all, as they were un- comfortable, had no cabs and were awkward engines to run and keep up. These engines cost $4500 and operat- ed on 50 pounds of steam. Curiously, the pantentee, Ross Winans, omitted in the 1837 patent text that these engines bounced at high speeds and were alarmingly unsteady. Indeed, a note published in Locomotive Engineering November 1890 noted: “they look comi- cal, walking around the yard with their grasshopper legs up in the air, their ex- haust through independent pipe and


ABOVE: Front view of a typical grasshopper design, which shows how the gears and beams were connected to the steam cylinder. AUTHOR’S COLLECTION


This view of the Number 6 shows the bare boiler with the jacket removed. The four wheel ten- der can be seen on the right side. The 1870s scene is at B&O’s Mount Clare Shops in Baltimore, which is currently the home of the B&O Museum. This historic engine is currently on display at Deeds Museum in Dayton, Ohio’s Carillon Park. AUTHOR’S COLLECTION


46 FEBRUARY 2012 • RAILFAN.COM


the water tank sitting straddle of the fire-door.” The exhaust pipes standing high above the boiler were much like escape pipes on a river steamer, and they vented steam from a turbine like fan or blower that exited the fire. The fans were removed from some of the grasshoppers in later years, but most il- lustrations show them in place, however. As built these engines ran with four wheel tenders. Small vertical water tanks were added behind the boiler when they were rebuilt as shop switch- ers in the 1860s. It was necessary to add a tunnel-like extension to the fire- box so the fire door was outside the tank. This extension was called a dutch oven and is visible in photograph of the No. 6. Other changes included add-on cabs – these engines were the first cab forwards, it should be noted. The axle pedestals were replaced with cast iron bolt-on’s in place of the original plate extensions. The history of these relics was han- dled in a loose and unprofessional man- ner. Their names and numbers were so


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60