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Scale © RUTLAND RAILS BEYOND THE


The Rutland Railway shut down in 1961, ending an era in New England railroading. Three years later the railroad was revived by the state of Vermont and began operation as two different companies. Author Philip R. Jordan looks at the Rutland’s successors — the Vermont Railway and Green Mountain Railroad — with a tour of the lines between Burlington, Vermont, and North Walpole, New Hampshire, as well as numerous black & white photos illustrating rolling stock and structures of both. Steam is repesented through a look at Steamtown’s tenure on the Green Mountain in Bellows Falls, and oddball diesels are presented on the CLarendon & Pittsford, which connected with the Vermont at Rutland. Locomotive and rolling stock rosters are included, as well as a map.


(C00054) $12.95 + s&h


Carstens Publications, Inc. To Order Call: 1-888-526-5365


or on-line at: www.carstensbookstore.com 88 JANUARY 2012


note. For the CP, CN, A&M, and WNYP units this is easily corrected by changing CV 115 to a value of 3. I am not an expert on PGE/BCOL/BC Rail horns so a bit of experimentation with other values for CV 115 will produce the correct five-chime horn sound. It’s little wonder that the C-630M


models were sold out at Bowser before the container from China was even opened. This is a superb effort that combines prototype fidelity with excel- lent paint schemes and a dynamite sound system. The retail price is $169.95 for the d.c. version and $269.95 with sound and DCC. See your local hobby dealer without delay. “Gen- tlemen, Start Your Engines!”—KEN GOSLETT


Little Giant, SP No. 1: On3/On30/O scale Mfg. by Rich Yoder Models, 7 Edgedale Court, Wyomissing, PA, 19610: www.richyodermodels.com. Enthusiasts of narrow gauge model-


ing come in two types: those who follow prototype practice and those who pre- fer the fun, funky fantasy route. With this O scale model of Southern Pacific diesel No. 1, known as “Little Giant,” it’s quite possible that those two camps have found some common ground. Furthermore, it’s great to see a brass importer offer up a prototype-based,


three-foot gauge subject from beyond the much-modeled Colorado lines. While many modelers enjoy the D&RGW and RGS (and with good rea- son), there are others looking for nar- row gauge prototypes from beyond the Rocky Mountains. Now those (like me) who are fascinated by the Southern Pacific’s legendary Keeler Branch have a well-executed, smooth-running mod- el around with which to base a layout. This diesel would also be equally at


home on a modern industrial line, a subject that narrow gauge modelers of- ten overlook in favor of logging or min- ing lines populated by that trinity of geared steam power: the Shay, the Heisler and the Climax. But enough of philosophy; onto some history, courtesy of a write-up by SP his- torian Joe Dale Morris that was posted on the Rich Yoder Models website. In the early 1950’s the Southern Pa-


cific had three 4-6-0’s to hold down Keeler Branch assignments. Two of the three were in good condition, but the diesel had come to the Southern Pacific and the railroad realized that its Bak- ersfield Shops would at some point be unable to maintain and rebuild steam engines. The choices were: abandon the Keeler Branch, convert it to stan- dard gauge, or dieselize it. In 1953, SP turned to General Elec- tric for a diesel to retire two of the


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